Jets To Brazil ‎– Orange Rhyming Dictionary

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Tracklist

Crown Of The Valley 4:55
Morning New Disease 4:16
Resistance Is Futile 3:00
Starry Configurations 4:03
Chinatown 5:35
Sea Anemone 5:20
Lemon Yellow Black 4:02
Conrad 4:58
King Medicine 5:42
I Typed For Miles 5:33
Sweet Avenue 5:16

Versions (10)

Cat# Artist Title (Format) Label Cat# Country Year
JT1038 Jets To Brazil Orange Rhyming Dictionary(CD, Album) Jade Tree JT1038 US 1998 Sell This Version
JT1038 Jets To Brazil Orange Rhyming Dictionary(2xLP, Album) Jade Tree JT1038 US 1998 Sell This Version
JT1038 Jets To Brazil Orange Rhyming Dictionary(2xLP, Album, Ora) Jade Tree JT1038 US 1998 Sell This Version
JT1038 Jets To Brazil Orange Rhyming Dictionary(2xLP, Album, RP, Gre) Jade Tree JT1038 US 1998 Sell This Version
JT1038 Jets To Brazil Orange Rhyming Dictionary(2xLP, Album, RP, Whi) Jade Tree JT1038 US 1998 Sell This Version
JT1038 Jets To Brazil Orange Rhyming Dictionary(CD, Album) Jade Tree JT1038 US 1998 Sell This Version
JT1038 Jets To Brazil Orange Rhyming Dictionary(CD, Album) Jade Tree JT1038 US 1998 Sell This Version
LP/CD JT1038 Jets To Brazil Orange Rhyming Dictionary(CD, Album) Jade Tree LP/CD JT1038 US 1998 Sell This Version
JT1038 Jets To Brazil Orange Rhyming Dictionary(LP, Blu + LP, Red + , Album, RP) Jade Tree JT1038 US 1998 Sell This Version
JT1038 Jets To Brazil Orange Rhyming Dictionary(LP, Yel + LP, Blu + , Album, RP) Jade Tree JT1038 US 1998 Sell This Version

Reviews

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satan165

satan165

December 17, 2015
referencing Orange Rhyming Dictionary, LP, Blu + LP, Red + , Album, RP, JT1038

I became a JTB fan by way of being a Jawbreaker fan. It took me years to really understand, or maybe just appreciate Jawbreaker. JTB was much easier via this album and I am not sure if it because I had an intro to Blake's songwriting/vocals, or just because they are a more accessible group. Or maybe - this album is just better, regardless of style.

The album starts off from 'Crown Of The Valley'. The intro counts guitar feedback through a wah pedal (took me a long time to figure out what all that squeaking was), which serves as a good foil to the very concise chords which follow and bring us into the lyrics. The words tell such a graphic tale, so vivid that I see it everytime I listen. I believe the song is describing a affluent and perhaps slightly eccentric family. Or maybe just interesting. It always reminds me of 'The Royal Tennenbaums'.

'Morning New Disease' is a perfect piece of beat influenced poetry, put to music. And that piece of music is simple, but extremely potent. Largely two chords, with a 'lead break' that consists of two notes, but all of it is so powerful. Again, the lyrics are so vivid, they aren't as concrete as the previous song but still very easily to climb inside of. The end of the song really builds, beginning with the quick break of just vocals and guitar before the band drops in, and leading all the way to the final coda as the drums slam cymbals and everyone ends on a final accent.

'Resistance is Futile' works well as a good interlude following the intensity of the previous song. The intro contains some of the most interesting lead guitar I've heard Blake churn out in any project. Nice messy arpeggios are the building blocks of the verse, which lead to the chorus and things are already turned around and repeating by 40 seconds in. After round two, there is a brief break consisting of feedback and sexy bending single notes before a return to form. There isn't a ton of substance to this song, its just simple fun and after the first two tracks, we need it.

I have been dying to know the simple arpeggios of 'Starry Configurations' for a while now, but the CD serves me well in lieu of that knowledge. Quick turnarounds (even quicker) like the previous song, but much quieter. The verses are devoid of guitar and it is here that you can appreciate the 3-piece approach of this original version of the band, before they brought another guitarists and (ugh) a keyboard into the mix. At the end of the day, its all about the lyrics and again things are so articulate and easy to sing along with, and think about them, as they are usually abstract.

'Chinatown' is similar in many ways to the previous song, or all of them. More arpeggios, more subtle silence and quiet arrangements and more great lyrics. Again, the verses are just bass and drums - you are here for one thing, to listen to Blake, and that's it. More great examples of quiet/loud here, great contrast between the fragile verses and the building and potent chorus. The track lengths increase here track by track, from 3 minutes (and not much there to get that far) on track 3, to five and a half minutes here, and it never drags or seems excessive. "I know the answer at four in the morning, I'm right again/ I'm Chinatown". The cycle of verses and choruses never seems to drag but the real treat is the last minute or so as the guitar tests the rest of the band - subtle as always - until things kind of fall apart for a beautiful, perfect ending.

'Sea Anemone' should have been the last song on the album (more on that later). This track took me a long time to get into and I remember clearly that I was in a hotel room in Dubuque Iowa, listening to this on some tiny (and state of the art, at the time), portable speakers and my 1st gen Ipod and finally the lyrics and the delivery just hit me. Maybe its just the noble effort, the balls it takes to sing so proud with so little to accompany you. The question regarding the tensile strength of shower rods troubles me still, daily. Sadness lurks beneath the surface if you don't take enough time to understand, and its so on the surface if you do, its hard to deal with.

'Lemon Yellow Black' is the 27th example (on an album with only 11 tracks) of how to play guitar within your capabilities, and within the genre you are working in. Of course, guitar capabilities are secondary in that case to the experience that comes with being a professional musician for years - but you can see it here. The riffs are simple, but so, so interesting that it's almost disappointing to realize how simple things are. Not in a condescending way...in a way that speaks of the fact that so little could do so much, while we (I) sit there banging out things so cerebral, while Blake 'already found it'. Great song that could have been on alternative radio and still not be a washed out piece of junk.

'Conrad' almost doesn't work - I assume that is some kind of echo effect, some kind of heavily processed guitar that kicks this track off and continues through the first verse/chorus. But if this song isn't that interesting, it is in the grasp of the cycle which is this album. This is the starting line, the simmering anger, the building quiet storm.

'King Medicine' is the best song I've heard that discusses drug addiction without being sappy, or over the top. It makes you think you wish you could be so articulate and speak so beautifully about something so vast and important, and impactful. But I've complimented (or more) the lyrics in basically every track in this review...this isn't just (another!) 6 minute track of a veteran and well studied poet showing off to a beat. The intro is epic, even in only 30 seconds before it ends and Blake once again relegates himself to be accompanied by only bass and drums. It makes me think of seeing this live, and how they would have to save it for later (or last) in the show, as on the album. The lyrics become clearer by the 2nd verse, and that's when you start to feel something build inside yourself. Anger rushes to the surface and swims between us by this art, that unites a phenomenon and all of us. And as in so many other songs, the verse/chorus/verse cycle seems to fly by so fast. Is it just an excuse to let Blake read the full 4 pages from his spiral notebook? Was he incapable of editing himself? But it feels like the tempo is increasing. Is it? Things are moving so fast now....as he exposes the subject of his narration, I am sucked in, drawn to the light and remembering the subjects from my own stories, the people I knew, and know. Then four minutes have passed, and where many songs ended already or are wrapping things up, things really begin to crescendo. The drums crash, the guitar wails as it has in so many songs on this record, late in the compositions...and then...

'foul weather friend/you were so dying/an amateur chemist now'

And a breakdown that has AGAIN vocals sans guitar, but the drums persist, they still continue to crash as if the Marshall stack were still active. It is the most intense moment in rock music I've heard that consisted of vocals WITHOUT guitar. And as the story reaches its close, things end.

I almost feel like it is an unfair onslaught to attempt to digest 'I Typed For Miles' after its predecessor. It starts almost poorly, with a riff so reminiscent of 'Heart Shaped Box' that wonder if maybe its time for the afterglow. But an importance screams from the voice 'leave me here to my devices...the call could come at any time...', and you realize we have not heard Blake approach the mic in this way for an entire album. Still, things cycle and things ebb and things flow...but the tension remains. Badly, it burns. 'your voice is average...in worried piles I typed for miles, AND YOU JUST STOOD THERE'. Barton Fink types away in a hotel room, sweaty and troubled, struggling with a case of constipation that supersedes our bowels. And just when the guitar interlude hits, and you think you've found an overblown pop song (are they all on this album?) that the coda hits. Blake questions his subject, intensely. He gets no answers.

Neither do we. Sweet Avenue is often mistaken for an array of sappy acoustic strummers. Might as well be. Sea Anemone would be perfectly placed here. But 10/11 ain't bad.