İlhan Mimaroğlu* Featuring Freddie Hubbard And His Quintet* ‎– Sing Me A Song Of Songmy

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Atlantic ‎– 81227-3669-2, Warner Jazz ‎– 81227-3669-2, Warner Strategic Marketing ‎– 81227-3669-2
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CD, Album, Reissue, Digipak
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Credits

Notes

"Sing Me A Song Of Songmy" a fantasy for electromagnetic tape with reciters, chorus, string orchestra, hammond organ, synthesized and processed sounds
Turkish poems from the book "Selected Poems"
Poem on tracks 3 and 8: "Lullaby For A Child In War"
Cover painting: "Massacre In Korea"

Freddie Hubbard And His Quintet recorded at Regent Sound Studios, NYC.
Instrumental and choral overdub at Atlantic Recording Studios, NYC.
Synthesized & processed sounds, mix components & final mixes realised in the studios of Columbia-Princeton Electronic Music Centre, NYC.
Mastered at Atlantic Recording Studios.
Made in Germany.

Barcode and Other Identifiers

  • Barcode (Printed): 0 81227 36692 6
  • Label Code: LC 000325
  • Rights Society: BIEM/GEMA

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kholkhoz

kholkhoz

July 8, 2018
In the competing schools of electroacoustic composition, Mİmaroğlu stood out as a non-joiner. Having left his native Turkey for the Columbia Princeton Electronic Music Center, Mİmaroğlu was an outlier even in that camp of international exiles led by Ussachevsky and Luening. Inspired by communist idealism and sympathy for popular resistance, Mİmaroğlu released a series of experimental albums, part agit-prop and part collage. Like experimental musical theatre, Sing Me a Song from 1971 combines texts from Turkish poet Fazıl Hüsnü Dağlarca, Vietnamese poet Nhā-Khê, and Che Guevara. But the primary sonic voice is that of post-bop trumpeter Freddie Hubbard. Sing Me A Song reflects on the turmoil of the conjuncture, referencing the Kent State massacre, the horrors of the Vietnam War, and the murder of Sharon Tate. Not an easy listen. The bursts of AM radio distortion and building crescendos of reverberation in conversation with Hubbard’s laments on the trumpet still retains urgency.