Ben Mink ‎– Foreign Exchange

Label:
Passport Records ‎– PB 2024
Format:
Vinyl, LP, Album
Country:
Released:
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Tracklist Hide Credits

A1 1995 Plus Tax
Written-By – Allan Soberman, Ben Mink
4:32
A2 Round Trip
Written-By – Ben Mink
1:44
A3 Foreign Exchange
Written-By – Ben Mink
3:00
A4 A.G. And Sea
Written-By – Ben Mink
1:05
A5 Visa - Vis
Synthesizer [Mini-moog] – Ed RothWritten-By – Ben Mink
5:34
B1 Shore Leave
Written-By – Ben Mink
5:37
B2 Back Talk
Written-By – Ben Mink
1:12
B3 Akiba's Night Out
Written-By – Ben Mink
2:41
B4 Manish Tuna
Guitar – Elliott FeldmanPiano – Jack SobermanWritten-By – Ben Mink, Elliott Feldman, Jack Soberman
3:31
B5 Talk Is Cheap
Electric Guitar – Mendelson Joe*Written-By – Ben Mink
5:01

Companies, etc.

Credits

Notes

All selections M, A, P, L. [indicates 100% Canadian content]

℗ & © 1980 Passport Records, Inc.

Barcode and Other Identifiers

  • Matrix / Runout (Side A run-out area): PB-1-2024 [Capitol "Target" logo] C STERLING
  • Matrix / Runout (Side B run-out area): PB-2-2024 [Capitol "Target" logo] STERLING C
  • Rights Society: CAPAC

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Blood23

Blood23

January 22, 2018
I only recently discovered this LP even existed and just got around to purchasing a download of it last week. Since then, it's been popping up in my plays repeatedly. In some ways, this almost qualifies as a "lost" FM album given that both drummer, Martin Deller, and keyboardist, Cameron Hawkins, are featured players here. The LP takes on a similar "progressive" vein to some of what FM were doing at the time, but skews away from the more commercial tendencies Hawkins was leaning into in favour of a more "folk" influenced type of instrumental experimentation. The results are both energetic and relaxed in equal turns with the playing focused on solid arrangements and melodies rather than overindulging musical virtuosity. Not to say that the chops aren't on display here, but they are in service of the songs and it's a great treat to hear music like this where the listener can focus solely on the instrumentation and there's no lyrical overlay to get in the way. Mink's work here makes me wish he'd done more solo work in this vein as it strikes its own distinct balance of styles and techniques, making it a truly idiosyncratic listen.