Big Star ‎– #1 Record

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Versions (30)

Cat# Artist Title (Format) Label Cat# Country Year
ADS-2803 Big Star #1 Record(LP, Album) Ardent Records (2) ADS-2803 US 1972 Sell This Version
ADS-2803 Big Star #1 Record(LP, Album) Ardent Records (2) ADS-2803 US 1972 Sell This Version
ADS-2803 Big Star #1 Record(LP, Album) Ardent Records (2) ADS-2803 US 1972 Sell This Version
ADS-2803 Big Star #1 Record(LP, Album) Ardent Records (2) ADS-2803 US 1972 Sell This Version
ADS-2803 Big Star #1 Record(LP, Album) Ardent Records (2) ADS-2803 US 1972 Sell This Version
ADS-2803 Big Star #1 Record(LP, Album) Ardent Records (2) ADS-2803 US 1972 Sell This Version
DOJOCD55 Big Star #1 Record(CD, Album) Castle Communications PLC DOJOCD55 France 1986 Sell This Version
WIK 53 Big Star #1 Record(LP, RE, RM) Big Beat Records WIK 53 Europe 1986 Sell This Version
LILP 4.00263 J Big Star #1 Record(LP, RE, Whi) Line Records LILP 4.00263 J Germany 1986 Sell This Version
WIKC 53 Big Star #1 Record(Cass, Album) Big Beat Records WIKC 53 Europe 1987 Sell This Version
AK 028, 60025 Big Star #1 Record(CD, Album, RE, RM, Dig) Akarma, Stax AK 028, 60025 Italy 1998 Sell This Version
STAX-60025 Big Star #1 Record(LP, RM) Ardent Records (2), Stax STAX-60025 Italy 1998 Sell This Version
VICP-62291 Big Star #1 Record(CD, Album, Ltd, RE, RM, Pap) Stax VICP-62291 Japan 2003 Sell This Version
AK 028 Big Star #1 Record(CD, Album, RE, RP) Akarma AK 028 Italy 2004 Sell This Version
028, 60025, none Big Star #1 Record(LP, Album, RE, RM) Akarma, Stax, Ardent Records (2) 028, 60025, none Italy 2004 Sell This Version
0888072315730 Big Star #1 Record(CD, Album, RE) Fantasy, Universal Music Group International, Ardent Records (2) 0888072315730 Europe 2009 Sell This Version
ADS 2803 Big Star #1 Record(LP, Album, RE) Ardent Records (2) ADS 2803 US 2009 Sell This Version
ADS 2803 Big Star #1 Record(LP, Album, RE) Ardent Records (2) ADS 2803 US 2009 Sell This Version
ADS 2803 Big Star #1 Record(LP, Album, RE, 200) Classic Records, Ardent Records (2) ADS 2803 US 2009 Sell This Version
0725543841513 Big Star #1 Record(LP, Album, RE, RM) Fantasy 0725543841513 UK & Europe 2009 Sell This Version
ADS-2803 Big Star #1 Record(LP, RM, 140) Ardent Records (2), Classic Records ADS-2803 US 2009 Sell This Version
0602527417899 Big Star #1 Record(LP, Album, Ltd, Num, RE, RM, Yel) Fantasy, Ardent Records (2) 0602527417899 UK & Europe 2010 Sell This Version
STX-35951-02 Big Star #1 Record(CD, Album, RE, RM) Stax Records, Ardent Records (2) STX-35951-02 US 2014 Sell This Version
4M240 Big Star #1 Record(LP, Album, RE, 180) Ardent Records (2), 4 Men With Beards 4M240 US 2014 Sell This Version
ADS 2803 Big Star #1 Record(LP, Album, RE, Gol) Ardent Records (2) ADS 2803 US 2014 Sell This Version
4M240 Big Star #1 Record(LP, Album, Ltd, RE, Pur) 4 Men With Beards, Ardent Records (2) 4M240 US 2016 Sell This Version
0888072317314 Big Star #1 Record(LP, Album, RE, 180) Fantasy, Universal Music Group International 0888072317314 UK & Europe 2016 Sell This Version
ADS 2803, ADS-2803 Big Star #1 Record(LP, Album, RE) Ardent Records (2), Ardent Records (2) ADS 2803, ADS-2803 US Unknown Sell This Version
ADS 2803, ADS-2803 Big Star #1 Record(LP, Album, RE, 200) Ardent Records (2), Ardent Records (2) ADS 2803, ADS-2803 US Unknown Sell This Version
ADS 2803, ADS-2803 Big Star #1 Record(LP, Album, Unofficial) Ardent Records (2), Ardent Records (2) ADS 2803, ADS-2803 US Unknown Sell This Version

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tinylittlealien

tinylittlealien

November 1, 2018
referencing #1 Record, LP, Album, ADS-2803
Does anybody else ever wonder if Lynyrd Skynyrd kinda ripped off the guitar style from the opening track on this album? lol ever since i first heard this, i was like damn, that sounds like that trademark Lynyrd Skynyrd style..... But this came out a year before the first Skynyrd album..... Hmmm...
jtm1967

jtm1967

September 21, 2018
referencing #1 Record, LP, Album, ADS-2803
My pressing is a promotional copy with NO hole punch or cut out. This is the 1st press of this iconic lp. Laminated sleeve as well
DrewMeyer

DrewMeyer

May 20, 2018
referencing #1 Record, LP, Album, RE, ADS 2803
Fantastic pressing. Don't have the classic records version to compare but I can't imagine it can be much better. The Tip-On sleeve is glossy and looks beautiful, never seen a cover like it. And the record of course sounds amazing with the Chris Bellman mastering. As close to an original as you can get without spending outrageous money, highly recommended.
DarreLP

DarreLP

April 22, 2018
referencing #1 Record, LP, Album, RE, ADS 2803
Not sure if it's just my copy or the pressing but side B is extremely crackly. These are also some of the ugliest label reproductions I've ever seen. Looks like they took the original labels and made bad color photocopies down at kinkos. Not happy with this copy...though the music is great.
DarreLP

DarreLP

April 22, 2018
referencing #1 Record, LP, RM, 140, ADS-2803
Really? "Regular weight" is now hype-sticker worthy? That is absurd.
streetmouse

streetmouse

March 8, 2018
edited 9 months ago
referencing #1 Record, LP, Album, ADS-2803

I’ve been around music my entire life, perhaps taken music a bit too seriously at times, and certainly have stumbled across my fair share of tortured artists who just can’t get noticed.

The first that comes to mind is Todd Rundgren, a man who’s had his moment in the sun, but achieved more success as a producer than an artist. Then of course there’s the late Gram Parsons, a man who like Todd, seemed to be ahead of his time, a man with aspirations that inspired the likes of Keith Richards (of The Rolling Stones), but just couldn’t gain the acceptance he was looking for. And then there was Philadelphia’s own Ken Kweder & The Secret Kids, whose rehearsal space I passed hundreds of times on my way to South Street. All this brings me to Alex Chilton, who fronted the band The Boxtops, with the stunning single “The Letter” back in the 60’s, and then went through more changes than just about any artist I know.

Other musicians have cited Chilton as being an the inspiration to their sound, and among them are The Replacements along with R.E.M. and Teenage Fanclub. All of that just sort of made me nuts, as I wasn’t hearing what these folks were. Then it dawned on me that those musicians were not hearing Alex Chilton either, they were relating to aspects of Chilton’s music, aspects of his vocals, aspects of his ideas, which caused me to wonder if I could rate an artist highly simply based on a series of ideas, concepts and deliveries, rather than to a finished product. To that end I began talking to those, such as Paul Westerburg, asking them what was so special about Big Star that provoked such acclaim from them. The answer I got, each and every time, was something along the line of, “Listen to his part right here” … “What Alex does on this song is simply stunning,” and “His concept was so original.”

All this left me scratching my head, not so much in wonder or awe that I missed what these musicians were talking about, but that they weren’t talking about the music of Alex Chilton at all, they were talking around it, pointing out splendid moments, insightful note combinations, but never as songs that where impressionable or even good, leaving me with the notion that they were wrapped up in the ideas that Alex Chilton had, but could never bring to fruition, while others who listened to Chilton were able to build on those ideas and achieve great success. Of course this puts Alex Chilton in an odd place, praised by critics who alone in their bathrobes and bedrooms have these ah-ha moments, and then wonder why the rest of the world hasn’t made Alex Chilton the saint they hear playing in the corner to no one other than a small self-identified ‘select’ group of listeners who’d been blessed by the light.

So last week I stumble on the Big Star documentary, of course thinking that perhaps hearing and seeing a sequential time line would unfold this music for me and correct my thinking before a missed opportunity was forever etched into my brain. Even with the story being enlightening, I found it to be irrelevant when it came to the actual music that was not working for me, and now, I think never will.

While I’ll admit that the songwriting might be better than average, though nearly everything about it from there on seemed wrong and out of place. Chilton’s vocals are uninspiring unemotional and grating, even flat, as if he couldn’t care, and after seeing the documentary, I’m convinced that he didn’t care. The music comes off as disorienting and confused, with parts sounding as if they’re actually going to overheat my amplifier. Chilton represented everything I disliked about music of the 70’s, one bad version copied from another in chain of bad songs that were endlessly played on the radio until it was impossible to distinguish good from bad or originals from copies … leaving me feeling that the end of rock n’ roll was upon me.

Then it hit me like a silver bullet to the temple, I didn’t have to enjoy Big Star, I didn’t have to keep it a secret that I didn’t like Big Star, I could just say it, and I will, “I don’t like Big Star.” Liking or not liking music is subjective, though the divinely inspired chosen few would have me believe that there’s something wrong with me, endlessly trying to convince me that because I pick and chose which of Wilco’s songs resonate best with me, that that in itself proves that I could come to terms with Big Star and be welcomed into the fold. But see, these same people refuse to give me the same freedom I give them, they don’t see that differing takes on music are essentially the same as different flavors of icing on a cake, meaning there’s not one single thing wrong with me because the music of Big Star doesn’t click with me.

I would suggest that there are far more music lovers like myself, feeling, or perhaps coerced into thinking that they too must get aboard the airplane, or the fast train, and have been beating themselves up for years, when they should just stop, and admit that they like the idea of The Ramones better than the actual band, who created and then recreated song after same song.

So yes, I’m on board with those who were deeply influenced enough by Big Star to go out and do something resounding fresh and new, building on the ideas of Alex Chilton rather than copying or emulating him. And if you can actually make it through a Big Star album, then my hat's off to you, and I'm deeply pleased that you've found music that delights your listening space, but please, don't pull out a Big Star album for me and say, "Just listen to this part right here."

*** The Fun Facts: The band name Big Star was lifted from the name of the grocery store chain, Big Star Markets, the band members frequented for snacks during their recording sessions.

Review by Jenell Kesler
Malanderer

Malanderer

January 20, 2018
referencing #1 Record, LP, Album, ADS-2803
I have this but mine says STXS-0261-1 with a the matrix etching being a drawing of saturn next to a star. It also has a Promo Copy sticker on it. Any ideas?
silkyskillz

silkyskillz

January 5, 2018
referencing #1 Record, LP, Album, RE, 180, 0888072317314
any comments on the sound quality of this pressing? cheers
hauntologist

hauntologist

June 30, 2017
edited about 1 year ago
referencing #1 Record, LP, Album, ADS-2803
Just wanted to drop in and post a review(s) of what is actually the lesser-known 1978 Stax UK two-fer pressing of "#1 Record" + "Radio City" s (i.e., this 2xLP: https://www.discogs.com/Big-Star-1-Record-Radio-City/release/2212390 ), with the hope that it may be helpful to anyone who may be fretting over the daunting prospect of hunting down original Ardent copies of these records--which, while prohibitively pricey since *at least* the early 2000s, will nowadays not only obliterate your wallet, but damn near take a few chunks of butt-cheek with 'em. Here goes….

Abbreviated review: The Stax two-fer UK pressing sounds very nice and, while not exactly a dollar bin record, is a vastly cheaper way of obtaining good-sounding, all-analog vinyl copies of the first two Big Star LPs.

Full review: ***CRUCIAL CAVEAT***: I *have not* compared the Stax two-fer with actual, physical copies of the original Ardent US pressings. I can’t afford those records, either. The best I could do was to compare the two-fer with FLAC vinyl rips executed by the highly respected ”pbthal,” whose contributions to What.CD (RIP) were once an essential element of what made that legendary (and legendarily exclusive) file-sharing site so great. In light of this fact, it is with *massive emphasis* that I assert that the following review is ***fraught with huge limitations*** and must be taken with a golf ball-sized grain of salt. With all these qualifications and potential pitfalls in mind, here’s the setup on which I conducted the A/B shootout:

McIntosh C29 preamp
McIntosh MC 2205 amp
JBL L100T3 speakers
Technics SL-1200mk2 + Shure M97xE cart + JICO SAS stylus (for playing the records)
Music Streamer II DAC (for playing the FLAC files)

I am unsure as to what pbthal’s setup was when he ripped the records--he constantly evolves and improves his setup--but one can safely assume that it was top-of-the-line. Also possibly noteworthy is that he used a white label promo copy of “Radio City.”

Regardless, I got the same impression from both shootouts: In each case, pbthal’s FLAC vinyl rips were a tad brighter than my phono setup, and *possibly* very slightly more detailed; if the latter were the case, it’d probably be due to pbthal’s superior phono setup, but it was very close, so I’m not even sure it’s the case at all. Comparatively, my phono setup was a bit (not a lot) warmer, but the soundstage was wider, and the music seemed somehow less mediated to my ears. All in all, I slightly preferred listening to the records to the FLAC files. But these nit-pickings aside, the main thing that struck me during the shootouts was how ***similar*** the physical records sounded compared to the FLAC files. If I hadn’t been so hyper-focused on it, I may not even have noticed a difference if, say, I were listening from another room and a mischievous leprechaun were switching back and forth between the FLAC files and the turntable each song. I might notice, but I’m not *sure* that I would. They simply sounded more similar than different.

Now, I should hasten to add, again, that there are glaring limitations to the very notion of comparing vinyl pressings by using FLAC files for one record and an actual record for the other--so glaring that I wasn’t even sure I was going to post this review at all. But when it comes down to it, I walked away from that shootout convinced that the UK Stax two-fer is a pretty damn good-sounding 2xLP, and is probably (although I’m obviously not 100% certain) quite comparable to the original US Ardent pressings. Might the Stax pressing have used, say, second-generation tapes? Maybe, maybe not. But even if so, they did a dang good job with them. Indeed, I also walked away from the shootout feeling like the Stax two-fer was a good-sounding record *in general*, and it actually sounded better than I expected beforehand, given the era during and circumstances under which it was created (I don’t know too much about the albums’ recording history, can’t help but assume that they didn’t exactly have Beatles- or Led Zep-level budgets when they originally recorded them).

My ultimate conclusion/recommendation: If you ever see the 1978 “#1 Record” + “Radio City” two-fer Stax UK pressing for a good price, grab it without hesitation. It’s a good-sounding pair of records, and it may be the last chance you ever get to hear Big Star in glorious analog in your very own living room.
AphexFlynn

AphexFlynn

May 20, 2017
referencing #1 Record, LP, Album, Ltd, RE, Pur, 4M240
Anyone know how this pressing sounds? I saw that it was pressed by 4 Men With Beards and I don't want to waste my money on a terrible sounding record.