Brainchild (9) ‎– Healing Of The Lunatic Owl

Label:
A&M Records ‎– AMLS 979
Format:
Vinyl, LP, Album
Country:
Released:
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Tracklist Hide Credits

A1 Autobiography
Written-By – Edwards*
A2 Healing Of The Lunatic Owl
Written-By – Wilshaw*
A3 Hide From The Dawn
Written-By – Wilshaw*
A4 She's Learning
Written-By – Coles*
B1 A Time A Place
Written-By – Coles*
B2 Two Bad Days
Written-By – Edwards*
B3 Sadness Of A Moment
Written-By – Coles*
B4 To "B"
Written-By – Wilshaw*

Companies, etc.

Credits

Notes

Sleeve printed and made by MacNeill Press Ltd, London S.E.1

Other Versions (5 of 7) View All

Cat# Artist Title (Format) Label Cat# Country Year
444 Brainchild (9) Healing Of The Lunatic Owl(CD, Album, RE, Unofficial) Second Harvest 444 US 2008 Sell This Version
SLAM 47.022 Brainchild (9) Healing Of The Lunatic Owl(LP, Album) A&M Records SLAM 47.022 Italy 1971 Sell This Version
PCCY-10182 Brainchild (9) Healing Of The Lunatic Owl(CD, Album, RE) A&M Records PCCY-10182 Japan 1991 Sell This Version
AMS 1056 Brainchild (9) Healing Of The Lunatic Owl(LP, Album) A&M Records AMS 1056 Mexico 1970 Sell This Version
AUCD5027 Brainchild (9) Healing Of The Lunatic Owl(CDr, Album, RE, Unofficial) Aurora (7) AUCD5027 UK 2013 Sell This Version

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music_emporium

music_emporium

May 17, 2017
Brainchild's Healing of the Lunatic Owl is perhaps the single best album to have emerged from the late 1960s brass rock movement that had gained immense popularity due to Blood, Sweat & Tears, and Chicago Transit Authority's chart topping hits. Brainchild definitely falls on the Chicago side of this equation from a musical perspective. I've long felt that Chicago is somewhat under-appreciated in today's world for how groundbreaking they truly were - mixing carefully crafted pop songs, with complex horn charts, and insane unhinged psychedelia. The latter two elements eventually fell off the train (so to speak), and all that most anyone remembers today is an old boring pop band for middle aged housewives who spend all day on Facebook. The English septet Brainchild is the embodiment of everything that was good about Chicago - without any of the excess or trivial moments. Brainchild's ability to pen a beautiful pop song is jaw dropping in its execution. The horn charts are complicated, perfectly played, and yet still tuneful. There's an element of psychedelic rock, but it's not the main focus - but rather a powerful ingredient to the overall stew. There's also one other aspect to Brainchild, that most horn rock bands did not pursue back then, and that's an absolute appreciation of progressive rock. The latter element shows up repeatedly in how each composition develops - the constant changing of moods, dynamics, and meters. The title track perhaps is the best example of everything mentioned above: A stunning pop melody, great vocals, psychedelic interludes, and a progressive rock structure. Other superior tracks include 'She's Learning' which features a grungy organ, gravelly vocals, psych guitar, and an ominous brass section; 'A Time and Place', a progressive oriented track clocking in at 9 minutes, which starts with melancholy flute, before launching the Latin percussion, organ, jazz rhythm guitar, and hard hitting trumpet/trombone charts; 'Sadness of a Moment' is the kind of song that Greg Lake could have penned for King Crimson in his prime - complete with soft echoed vocals, acoustic guitar, and flute. Goosebump inducing music right here!; 'To "B"' closes the album, after a brief but beautiful flute opening, as it started with 'Autobiography' - a powerful horn rock song in the Chicago Transit Authority tradition. For me, the best horn rock album ever. Unless the style reemerges in our lifetime, it's hard to imagine anything ever besting it.
music_emporium

music_emporium

January 18, 2012
edited over 4 years ago
AWESOME !!!
music_emporium

music_emporium

January 18, 2012
edited over 4 years ago
From:
http://rockasteria.blogspot.be/2011/05/brainchild-healing-of-lunatic-owl-1970.html
Lennie Wright from Web and Samurai produced Brainchild's first and only album, so it's no surprise that "Healing of the Lunatic Owl" is in a similar style to both "I Spider" and Samurai's self-titled album. That means early 70's progressive rock dominated by horns and organ.

The opener "Autobiography" starts as a straightforward rocker, but turns in the middle into a complex instrumental section that lasts for the rest of the song. Although it's one of the shortest tracks on the album, it sums up nearly every side of the band's music very well. The swinging title-track is one of the highlights, and the structure is really not that far away from "Autobiography", but the track returns to the main part at the end again.

The slow and bluesy beat of "Hide From the Dawn" is a bit more basic, but the long instrumental passages and complex arrangements make it well worth listening to. "She's Learning" is the catchiest song on the album, and has almost hit-potential. However, the longest tune is "A Time A Place", featuring dramatic vocal parts mixed with more intricate instrumental parts.

"Two Bad Days" is for me the least good song, but the ballad "Sadness of a Moment" is really beautiful, consisting of nothing else than flute, guitar and vocals. And the album finally closes with the excellent instrumental "To "B"". I'm not sure if I would rate this album as high as "I Spider" or "Samurai", but it's still a very good LP worth finding if you enjoy the two mentioned bands or progressive rock with horns in general.