C.E.B. ‎– Countin' Endless Bank

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Tracklist

Seems You Forgot 3:40
Goes Like This 4:01
Get The Point 3:55
The Man 4:10
Pass The Ammo 4:14
Fuck 'Em Up 3:28
Back Up In Da Joint 3:39
M.D. 3:19
Pass The Buddha 3:53
Monkey On My Back 4:00
Gorilla 4:05

Versions (8)

Cat# Artist Title (Format) Label Cat# Country Year
C 53735 C.E.B. Countin' Endless Bank(LP, Album) Ruffhouse Records C 53735 US 1993 Sell This Version
CK 53735 C.E.B. Countin' Endless Bank(CD, Album) Ruffhouse Records CK 53735 US 1993 Sell This Version
COL 473638 2 C.E.B. Countin' Endless Bank(CD, Album) Columbia COL 473638 2 France 1993 Sell This Version
473638 2 C.E.B. Countin' Endless Bank(CD, Album) Ruffhouse Records 473638 2 Europe 1993 Sell This Version
CT 53735 C.E.B. Countin' Endless Bank(Cass, Album) Ruffhouse Records CT 53735 US 1993 Sell This Version
CT 53735 C.E.B. Countin' Endless Bank(Cass, Album) Ruffhouse Records, Columbia CT 53735 Canada 1993 Sell This Version
none C.E.B. Countin' Endless Bank(Cass, Album, Promo) Ruffhouse Records none US 1993 Sell This Version
ACC53735 C.E.B. Countin' Endless Bank(Cass, Album, Promo) Ruffhouse Records ACC53735 US 1993 Sell This Version

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djrun

djrun

December 9, 2004
edited over 12 years ago
referencing Countin' Endless Bank, LP, Album, C 53735
Many have thought that the careers of Steady B and Cool C finished after the releases of their last solo albums in 1991 and 1990 respectively. However few remember the comeback attempt the two sought out in 1993. The C.E.B. project included the two Hilltop Hustlers along with DJ/emcee Eaze. The rappers would have to adjust their styles to the changing times of hardcore hip-hop that was ever so prevalent by the time the album was released. Cool C masterfully creates a rough and rugged lyrical flow, a far cry from earlier recordings such as "Glamorous Life". On the other hand, Steady B isn't able to fully update his raps and many times the outdated old school rhyme pattern becomes apparent in many of the tracks. Yet what he lacks in lyrical talent, he makes up in production. Using a wide range of funk and soul samples, Steady lights up tracks such as "Back Up In Da Joint" and "Get The Point" while also being able to produce dark hardcore beats on "Gorilla" and "Pass The Buddah". Another indication of the group's attempt to fit into the edgier rap scene is the attacks on "soft/sell-out" peers such as P.M. Dawn, Vanilla Ice, MC Hammer, Tone Loc, Young MC, and Marky Mark. Former mentor and producer L.G. (Lawrence Goodman) also is targeted on the album, alluding to some bad blood that might have gone down in the past. However, what makes this a critical release is the various references in the tracks that seem somewhat prophetic. For example, Steady B boasts on one track, "I need dough / But which way do I go? / Minimum wage or the no-no? / With no one to talk to / And when I get with the crew, you know what I'm going to do / Rip the street like a hurricane / And in my path, some people might feel pain / And I might end up dead, or in jail / With no way to make bail". Two years later after being dropped from Ruffhouse and scrambling to collect ends, Cool C and Steady B got caught up with the law after robbing a bank and killing a police officer in the process. Steady B was charged as an accomplice driving the getaway vehicle while Cool C was pinned as being the gunman (which he disputes) and subsequently received the death penalty where he is currently on death row alongside political prisoner Mumia Abu-Jamal.
djrun

djrun

August 18, 2004
edited over 12 years ago
referencing Countin' Endless Bank, CD, Album, CK 53735

Many have thought that the careers of Steady B and Cool C finished after the releases of their last solo albums in 1991 and 1990 respectively. However few remember the comeback attempt the two sought out in 1993. The C.E.B. project included the two Hilltop Hustlers along with DJ/emcee Eaze. The rappers would have to adjust their styles to the changing times of hardcore hip-hop that was ever so prevalent by the time the album was released. Cool C masterfully creates a rough and rugged lyrical flow, a far cry from earlier recordings such as "Glamorous Life". On the other hand, Steady B isn't able to fully update his raps and many times the outdated old school rhyme pattern becomes apparent in many of the tracks. Yet what he lacks in lyrical talent, he makes up in production. Using a wide range of funk and soul samples, Steady lights up tracks such as "Back Up In Da Joint" and "Get The Point" while also being able to produce dark hardcore beats on "Gorilla" and "Pass The Buddah". Another indication of the group's attempt to fit into the edgier rap scene is the attacks on "soft/sell-out" peers such as P.M. Dawn, Vanilla Ice, MC Hammer, Tone Loc, Young MC, and Marky Mark. Former mentor and producer L.G. (Lawrence Goodman) also is targeted on the album, alluding to some bad blood that might have gone down in the past. However, what makes this a critical release is the various references in the tracks that seem somewhat prophetic. For example, Steady B boasts on one track, "I need dough / But which way do I go? / Minimum wage or the no-no? / With no one to talk to / And when I get with the crew, you know what I'm going to do / Rip the street like a hurricane / And in my path, some people might feel pain / And I might end up dead, or in jail / With no way to make bail". Two years later after being dropped from Ruffhouse and scrambling to collect ends, Cool C and Steady B got caught up with the law after robbing a bank and killing a police officer in the process. Steady B was charged as an accomplice driving the getaway vehicle while Cool C was pinned as being the gunman (which he disputes) and subsequently received the death penalty where he is currently on death row alongside political prisoner Mumia Abu-Jamal.