Cabaret Voltaire ‎– Technology: Western Re-Works 1992

Label:
Virgin ‎– CVCD4, Virgin ‎– CV CD4
Format:
CD, Album
Country:
Released:
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Tracklist Hide Credits

1 Talking Time 6:08
2 24-24 6:15
3 Crackdown 6:35
4 Just Fascination 5:36
5 Sleepwalking 6:25
6 Kino 6:13
7 Ghost Talk 6:59
8 I Want You 6:34
9 Bad Self Pt .1 6:48
10 Sensoria 6:03
11 I Want You (808 Heaven Mix)
Remix [Reconstructed And Mixed] – Altern 8
5:42
12 Kino (4) 5:27

Companies, etc.

Credits

Notes

Produced and remixed @ Western Works, Sheffield except track 11 reconstructed and mixed for 808 Acid Revival Productions. All selections published by Island Music Ltd. The copyright in this sound recording is owned by Virgin Records Ltd.

This compilation
© 1992 Virgin Records Ltd.
This compilation
℗ 1992 Virgin Records Ltd.

Barcode and Other Identifiers

  • Barcode (Printed): 5 012981 444426
  • Barcode (Scanned): 5012981444426
  • Other (Distribution Code): PM 527
  • Other (Distribution Code): 262 982
  • Label Code: LC 3098
  • Matrix / Runout (Mirrored): CVCD-4 11 DADC AUSTRIA
  • Matrix / Runout (Pressing Code - Mirrored): A2

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Crijevo

Crijevo

October 25, 2008
edited over 4 years ago
In their era of total submission to techno and rave, Cabaret Voltaire delivered this finely crafted collection of revisited originals. Very probably, if discovered at the time, 'Technology' despite its justified title might have been a confused case of renditions - but now that you distance yourself from 1992 and give it all a proper listen once again, you'll discover the reasons why Cabaret Voltaire still remain on top of electronic priorities in terms of both - influence and innovation.

Not that their entire catalogue from the nineties' crossover period fared well: there were some strange (albeit logical) step-overs where Kirk and Mallinder simply got stuck in the middle of trends left with lots of choices but at one point lost without particular direction. However, 'Technology' is a stunning 'lost link' between Kraftwerk's 'The Mix', The Cure's 'Mixed Up' and Clock DVA's cybernetic revival. Obviously, the Cabs were very careful about re-arranging their originals for the new age - this album is a rather conceptual take on their Virgin catalogue (choosing selections from 'The Crackdown', 'Micro-phonies', 'The Covenant, the Sword and the Arm of the Lord' and 'Drinking Gasoline' respectively). Each track is a symbolic re-work, keeping their trademark sound while discreetly using new ideas for improvement.

While such attempts at 'Talking Time', 'Just Fascination', '24-24' or 'Kino' show there was no need for any drastic changes, there were also unexpected (if not unpleasant) surprises. This mainly addresses 'I Want You', here delivered as a bombast dance track, rid of its funk brutality the original remains loved for. Merely bits of what's sampled from 1985 including Mal's whispering vocals, betray what's left from it. It is completely revised and new in that respect, but also the most tiring of the lot. In complement, even further drastic measures were taken with the inclusion of Altern 8's remix which dips further into hard-core techno of the day. Stepping over early Prodigy at any time but too shallow for Cabaret Voltaire's standards.

Among those more pleasant surprises however, is a wonderful, minimally charged acid-house rendition of 'Sleepwalking' and equally stunning, stripped down version of 'Sensoria' - plus "Crackdown" and 'Ghost Talk', both rendered into creepy avant-techno minimalism. In all, "Technology" is a truly respectable recollection of material that will never grow old.