Clem Alford ‎– Mirror Image

Label:
Magic Carpet Records ‎– MC 1003 CD
Format:
CD, Album, Reissue
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Tracklist Hide Credits

1 Mirror Image
Bass Guitar – Toni Campo*Drums – Harold FisherGuitar – Amancio D'SilvaPiano, Electric Piano [Fender Electric Piano] – Alan BranscombeSitar [Electronic Sitar] – Clem Alford
14:19
2 Raga Kirwani
Sitar, Tambura [Tanpura] – Clem AlfordTabla – Keshav Sathe
8:04
3 Raga Charukeshi
Sitar, Tambura [Tanpura] – Clem AlfordTabla – Keshav Sathe
8:16
4 Apocalypse
Flute – Dave HeathSitar – Clem Alford
5:16
5 Morning Storm
Flute – Dave HeathSitar – Clem Alford
3:08
6 Raga Khamaj
Sitar – Clem AlfordTabla – Mick Ripsher
15:35
7 Colours
Sitar – Clem Alford
4:07

Companies, etc.

Credits

Notes

"The Electronic Sitar of Clem Alford"

Total Programme 59.06

Tracks 1 to 3 are from the Mirror Image LP released in 1974.
Tracks 4 to 7 are bonus material.

Sleeve Notes:
John Mayer 1974
John Reed of Record Collector Magazine 1995

℗ 1974 & 1990 The copyright in this original sound recording is owned by Clem Alford
© 1974 & 1990 Clem Alford

Barcode and Other Identifiers

  • Matrix / Runout (Mirrored): B8777 MC 1003 CD :· 1:0 .MASTERED. BY NIMBUS
  • Mastering SID Code (Mirrored): IFPI L123
  • Mould SID Code: ifpi 2305
  • Rights Society (Mechanical (Recording) Rights): MCPS
  • Rights Society (Performance Rights): PRS

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ultimathulerecords

ultimathulerecords

December 1, 2016

CLEM ALFORD - MIRROR IMAGE (Magic Carpet MC 1003 CD) CD 60m
Billed as "The Electronic Sitar of Clem Alford" this mid-70's solo album by the sitar player from Magic Carpet is every bit as good as it was reputed to be. A surprise really, in that I wasn't too keen on the Magic Carpet LP, which had a way overblown reputation, but this is a truly creative album, made even more enjoyable by four bonus tracks recorded in 1990.
Side 1 of the original LP, the 14 minute Mirror Image itself, is an excellent example of ethno-jazz fusion, its amplified sitar through a wah-wah pedal, with piano, guitar, bass and drums backing, it's like Embryo blended with Popol Vuh. The second side of the LP had Raga Kirwani and Raga Charukeshi each at 8 minutes, combining sitar, tanpura and tablas, into a much more progressive music than Ravi Shankar, closest in feel to Al Gromer and Popol Vuh's YOGA.
Moving on sixteen years, Clem Alford proves to still be just as much an innovator. Combining computer synthesized and sampled sounds with sitar and flute on the tracks: Apocalypse and Morning Storm, he takes us to the darker realms of ethnic
new-age music. Raga Khamaj then, in contrast, offers a return to purely traditional Indian realms being only sitar and tabla. Finally we end with the drone invocation Colours in which the sitar blends in with a gently oscillating "Om" texture - the ideal ending!
review by Alan Freeman from Audion magazine 33 (1995).