Crossing Mind ‎– The Holographic Paradigm

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Cat# Artist Title (Format) Label Cat# Country Year
DATCD003 Crossing Mind The Holographic Paradigm(CD, Album) DAT Records DATCD003 Italy 2010 Sell This Version
DATCD003 Crossing Mind The Holographic Paradigm(9xFile, MP3, Album) DAT Records DATCD003 Italy 2010
DATCD003 Crossing Mind The Holographic Paradigm(9xFile, WAV, Album) DAT Records DATCD003 Italy 2010
DATCD003 Crossing Mind The Holographic Paradigm(CDr, Promo) DAT Records DATCD003 Italy 2010 Sell This Version
DATDG003 Crossing Mind The Holographic Paradigm(9xFile, FLAC, Album + 9xFile, MP3, Album, 320) DAT Records DATDG003 Italy 2012

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maroko

maroko

November 20, 2010
referencing The Holographic Paradigm, CD, Album, DATCD003
Ignoring the irrelevant comparison to the Etnica/Pleiadians clique, unless they released around four albums the scene wasn’t aware of, shedding some light on Crossing Mind’s output in 2010 is another great step into retrodelic future by DAT Records! Keeping in mind the date these tracks were produced in, and Stephane’s country of origin, the direction pursued throughout “The holographic paradigm” becomes obvious. I don’t see the purpose in throwing around statements about him sounding like a combination of a third of this act added to a quarter of that one divided by five eights of the one on the right, hiding in the corner.
Crossing Mind sounds like he’s supposed to, or better yet, like we expected him to sound.
Mid nineties goa trance aesthetic, multi layered tracks with infectious melodies and playful acid synths. Sure he’s more leaned towards the sheer melodic bliss manifested by fellow country men like Total Eclipse, Transwave or Jaia, rather than the dark twisted psychedelia of artists like X-Dream, Koxbox or Orichalcum & The Deviant, but then again, it all comes down to what do you really want to hear.
Personally, as much as I appreciate the effort many people put in order to contact the artist and make the release of this album possible, it’s the temporal shift which is the barrier here. Plain and simple, this album was supposed to get released well over a decade ago. Why didn’t that happen, I have no clue. It is more than obvious this artist has enough talent and ideas to go around twice, but I cannot escape the feeling that “The holographic paradigm” would have raised way more eyebrows back in 1996 than it does now. As much as it sounds awesome today, it reflects a sound and mood which don’t quite cut it for me like they used to.
However, those are only minor flaws, which rise way above the musical aspects, and at the end of the day, those related to the music count the most. As far as the music goes, it’s great. Melodic, hypnotic old school goa which presents endless soundscapes for one to get immersed in. Fans of the aforementioned artists, but even acts like Technossomy, early Miranda, Prana’s “Geomantik” and the debut album by Cosmosis should feel at home with this one. While it doesn’t bring anything radically new to the table (duh, did anyone really think it would?), it stays within the boundaries already defined by many former masters of the genre, but very successfully so. As yet another testament to the great old school legacy, this is a compulsory listen, especially to those old enough who remember the days when an album like this one would have been deemed the freshest thing to hit the scene since the colored Hallucinogen vinyls.
The tracks: not a weak moment here, but the harmonic beauty of Mental Escape, the deep, dense structure and psychotic arrangement of Hypnotropic really get at me, while the “let there be light” A.P. sample on the amazing psychedelic goa workout Psy Crise was a nice surprising touch.
The cover art is old school eye candy along the lines of Super Mario’s princess most of you never got to rescue, and will proudly sit and hold its own next to many other vintage gems you hold dear.
Another sure shot by DAT Records, which, once again gets my respect for swimming against the current and doing something different. Sure electronic music is always about moving forward, exploring and using new advancements in technology, building upon previously exploited territories and trying to keep up (or stay ahead) of the ever evolving and changing times, but an occasional dive in the past won’t kill you, ya know? For those who just can’t get enough of that old school flavor, Crossing Mind’s album is a smasher you can’t go wrong with. If your dread locks burned out by Y2K, you might want to look elsewhere though…
What was that movie called? Back To The Future? Well, there you go.