DJ Bass-T* ‎– Here Comes That Sound (Alright)

Label:
Aqualoop Records ‎– AQL 035
Format:
Vinyl, 12"
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  • Barcode: 4 014235 591437

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extrance2007

extrance2007

January 6, 2017

If you want something, anything to blame for the eruption of the hard pussy techno scene not long after the turn of the millennium, shift the blame to this slab of wax courtesy of two power players (or maybe musical propaganda pushers) Rocco & Bass-T (RIP rave on in heaven my beloved German cheese artisan). Here comes a sound that takes the mall acoustic Eurodance of the 90s and decides it needed to be brought into the modern age (which at the time was 2000 commercial trance) but I guess it needed to be a bit harder for all those "hardcore German ravers." Y'know, get the commercial trance scene's head outta it's ass and into the underground, right? If Pulsedriver and RedWing weren't getting the sword of power solid, which obviously it wasn't for our two friends here, maybe Your Spirit Is Shining needs a few harder kicks and a deeper bassline - oh wait we have hard trance for that. Nevermind let's just sully that genre even further.

Call it what you want - Commercial Hard Trance (right on the money), Euro House (I'm sorry what house? Jack will damn you to EDM hell for that), Euro Trance (Alice Deejay was not here), Dancecore (that's what these guys called it, right Rocco?), or God forbid Hands Up (make it stop! plz Basshunter) - but this self-loathing genre quickly caught on once DJs and producers got their hands on Aqualoop's latest single "Here Comes That Sound (Alright)." Since the genre had been developing, producers all across Germany wanted to get in on the action (hey a similar story happens 10 years later only with virgins the Netherlands and now we call it Big Room). Because "Here Comes That Sound" had fully made use of the newest technology already exploited incessantly by Hardstylers, the cut was clean and strong. Germans will be Germans, so of course an injection of acid was necessary but the hook was mature and unlike many commercial tracks at the time... the song used a tactic known as "progression" where it moves from one section to another in an evolving form but bringing new patterns in during the course of the song. I don't know maybe like real trance does? So in that sense it certainly is praiseworthy unlike the commercial trance of today. Maybe a listen to the b-side is worth it if you fell so deeply in love with the a-side because the Drag & Drop Remix doesn't add anything to original, you could say it is an alternative mix. But hell, the single didn't get much attention despite being so influential. Could be that there was an absence of meaningless female drawling oh I mean vocals. Sometimes those things are left better unsaid because who would have thought a commercial track could stand on it's own without singing? Actually, we all knew. Robert Miles proved that in '95 and now we hate him for it.

So what happens next? If you are still reading I applaud you for being at least somewhat interested in this trainwreck because here's where the fun begins. Pretty much every CT producer realized there was major cash to be made here, producers paired up and conceived new ideas to bore listeners and excite Eurozone contaminated ravers with predictable leads and cheesy as hell lyrics sung by talentless dykes who probably met the DJ while they were too f'ing wasted to leave the club so he exchanged buying her vocals on the condition he takes a trip into pussyland. Maybe that's how Rob Mayth and Mikesh got started but once you've got your style (or do a remix for DHT) legitimate fans will follow for years. After all, that's what this "genre" is about. Having fun, dancing for way too long, and cursing Special D. for injecting the same vocal samples in every - single - liveset. Let's not forget that some brave souls like DJ Uto, DJ Dean, DJ Yanny (ok everyone does have to have a prefix in this genre and that's sorta lame) who tried to export (Quake / Exit) or mature the genre (TTF / DNX) and they were mildly successful. Every once in a while it is good to medicate your children with Cascada or Master Blaster so they stay away from that newfangled Trap or whatever that recycled, oversampled shitshow is today. You might know that I mean if you grew up going on YouTube searching "DJ Splash" "Ravers Fantasy" "Miniature Fantasy" "Techno Trance Mix" or any other cardinals sins like that. Now it doesn't really matter because looking back on the whole deal, this is the only place you can find Swedish 30-somethings trying to jumpstyle and blue-eyed, striped-kneesock clad "pika girls" in the same damn place. HUMFS! as DJ Gollum would say.