Danny Tenaglia ‎– Global Underground 010: Athens

Label:
Boxed ‎– GU010CD
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2 × CD, Mixed, Compilation
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Tracklist Hide Credits

1-01 Stereo Dancer Absolute Reason 7:18
1-02 Unknown Artist Lapis Lazuli EP 3:11
1-03 B.P.T. Moody
Featuring – DM Binxter
6:51
1-04 Danny Tenaglia Turn Me On (John Ciafone's Dub)
Featuring – Liz TorresRemix – John Ciafone
6:35
1-05 Two Right Wrongans System Error 5:45
1-06 Thomas Krome The Real Jazz (Dahlbäck Mix)
Remix – Jesper Dahlbäck
5:00
1-07 The Deep Dom Dom Jump 5:52
1-08 Alexi Delano Debajo 4:30
1-09 The Scumfrog The Water Song 5:23
1-10 Icarus Round Midnight 4:02
1-11 E.B.E. (2) Deimos 4:24
1-12 Miss Kittin & The Hacker Frank Sinatra 3:39
1-13 Anthony Rother Red Light District 7:31
2-01 Tilt Seduction Of Orpheus 7:49
2-02 M.I.K.E. Deepest Jungle 6:09
2-03 Robbie Rivera Feel This 5:23
2-04 Mr. James Barth Stealin Music 4:45
2-05 Saint Etienne Cool Kids Of Death
Remix – Underworld
9:41
2-06 Mac Zimms Batido 5:23
2-07 Danny Tenaglia Music Is The Answer
Featuring – Celeda
8:20
2-08 Return Of The Native Da After 6:00
2-09 Barbarus Phonic Crawl 4:37
2-10 Yves Deruyter Feel Free 7:28
2-11 Stuff It Release The Pressure 6:22

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LeTenia_Paris

LeTenia_Paris

September 6, 2014
GU10 is one of the most fully-realized dance music compilations of all time by a larger-than-life artist.

Danny Tenaglia has always been a deejay's deejay, an artist who stood outside the boundaries and made his own rules. He's not without his share of mystery-- something impenetrable about the man. His music, spellbinding, provides its own guilt-free vision of hell and no cliches. It was the perfect soundtrack to the hedonistic nineties. I miss nothing in life. No regrets. But I'd give anything to be back on that dance-floor at the Factory and that Steve Dash sound-system when Danny is playing.

I first heard him at Fifth Column in DC in 1992 or 1993 when Dubfire (formerly of Deep Dish) brought him so the rest of us could have a listen at his New York boy with the weird name that he kept raving about. And man. From the first time on you could tell there was fire in that belly.

LeTenia, Paris (2014)
brunov

brunov

March 30, 2013
edited over 2 years ago
The first disc of this compilation was basically my introduction to proper EDM. I still don’t really recall why I had a copy of it illegally downloaded on my hard drive (I’ve since bought proper copies of the CD) but I did and the rest is, as they say, history.

Ten years after first hearing disc one I am confident that my view that it is one of the finest expressions of electronic music you’ll ever hear is not about sentiment anywhere near as much as it is a reflection of the reality that disc one becomes more relevant every time I hear it. Timelessness is a great indicator of a quality release; that this disc seems to become more relevant on each listen suggests a rare genius on the part of the artist.

Before I go any further I ought to deal with disc 2 and the release as a whole. There probably isn’t much that can be added to the comments of those who have previously posted on this page. To sum it up, the two CDs are a perfectly cohesive narrative for an increasingly rare style of DJing/track selection and a sound that is essentially a genre of its own (GU 10 spans the deepest house through to uplifting trance and covers everything in between without a single hint that one sound is even slightly out of place).

The down point with disc two, following the inevitable comparison with disc one, is that it ultimately dated even if it took the best part of a decade to do so. It is probably just another way of articulating the strength of this release to say that the pitched down techno of disc two was probably the motivation for the dark tribal and progressive house favoured by many world renowned DJs for the best part of 10 years after the release of GU10.

Getting back to the first disc, I was initially fascinated by the raw sexuality present throughout which, when combined with the stunning depth of the opening sequence of tracks conjured a mystique about Tenaglia, NYC and Tunnel (about which I had read so much) which I’ve never really gotten over.

I wouldn’t even know where to start if I was to select a favourite track. Anthony and Tuttle’s (incorrectly referred to as “Stereo Dancer”) touch up of Cyrus’ “Presence”, renamed “Absolute Reason”, sets the tone perfectly with its cavernous yet slow burning dub chords. Lapis Lazuli is the bridge which connects the opening dub sequence with the irreverent sleaze and dark funk of BPT’s “Moody” and Ciafone’s Chiapet remix of “Turn Me On”.

Tenaglia consolidates with “System Error” which, again, bridges the previous phase of the mix with the next, soulful/tribal segment. The layering of the “Music is the Answer” vocals on Dahlback’s remix of “The Real Jazz” is a particular highlight, breathing a genuinely soulful flair into a mix that, to this point, has a purely dark aesthetic.

“Dom Dom Jump” and Delano’s “Dejabo” drag the mix back into the black with Dejabo in particular suffocating the mix under its distorted, grinding dubby stabs. This is somehow the precursor to the set’s most uplifting moment and perhaps its masterstroke.

The set then takes off, soaring on the back of “The Water Song’s” incredible otherworldly melodies, beginning the crescendo of the mix. Mull’s “Round Midnight” substitutes the uplifting grace of Scumfrog’s track with the driving kicks of one of the better tracks to come out of the first wave of Sweedish techno, while EBE’s “Deimos” takes the set to its climax. Any fans of Basic Channel and dub techno would appreciate that Deimos is one of the genre’s best tracks and, as far as I can tell, is a chronically under-utilised and under-appreciated techno track.

Finally, and without anywhere else to go, Tenaglia turns to the pure filth of Miss Kitten & The Hacker’s “Frank Sinatra” and Rother’s “Red Light District” in a move that seems ridiculously obvious, because it is such a perfect conclusion, but for the reality that DT is possibly the only guy that would think to pull it off.

With the benefit of five or six years of delving as far into house and techno, and electronic music generally, as time will permit it seems Tengalia’s masterful combination of deep and dark house, dub (even tribal) techno and electro was so far ahead of its time that the scene has only really caught up with it in the last few years.

Without having identified anything else that matches GU10 disc one earlier in time or in the 10 years following, I consider it to be the blueprint for a style of music that, whatever Tenaglia was doing at Tunnel aside, had no real wide ranging expression until 2008/2009 and the emergence of the NYC/Bunker guys like Levon Vincent, DJ Qu, Joey Anderson, Anthony Parasole, and Eric Cloutier. I’d love to get the views of this “second wave” on the significance of this release to what what they are now doing. It may have taken too long but it seems that this sound has finally founds its place. If this was their motivation it is no coincidence that these guys have gone on to take the world by storm.
gettum8

gettum8

September 17, 2012
edited about 1 month ago

Disc one is good, Disc two is one my favorite mixes ever. Recently listened to it on a road trip driving through the canyons of Utah as the sun was coming up and at that moment, with the scenery, it sounded amazing. I will always have a certain nostalgia for these GU Mixes. Athens, San Francisco, New York and London are my favorites. They were so influential to my taste in dance music throughout my early 20's. There is plenty of good music now [2016], but these early GU releases were in a class by themselves.
jiggawhat

jiggawhat

January 24, 2012
edited over 3 years ago

The first time I listened to this I thought it was boring, aside for two tracks that just totally captured me, BPT's Moody, and the John Ciafone dub of Turn Me On. I gave it a second listen, and I was like, wait, this isn't so bad. It's pretty good. "Frank Sinatra" is catchy even though it's completely stupid, and Red Light District is pretty groovy too. On the third listen, it finally clicked. It's an immense journey and certainly validated the hype that I was hearing about Tenaglia back during this time. It always puts a smile on my face. Everyone knows about Digweed's and Sasha's contributions to the GU series, but poor old Danny Tenaglia gets overlooked. Don't make that mistake.
Secret_Agent

Secret_Agent

January 11, 2010
One of my favorite mixes ever, especially remembering being right there at the tunnel listening to Miss Kittin live.... not just listening to it, but watching it all happen in front of me word for word. This 2 cd set was perfectly put together and I will always regard it as one of the best, just like the DJ.
maroko

maroko

March 10, 2008
I love this one to death. It probably has to do more with the fact of it being the first ever Global Underground DJ mix I confronted, and had never before heard anything like it.
It blew me away. It still does.
Though it has lost some power during the years, those who were there should enjoy it now more than ever before. The tracklist is fabulous- groovy, dance friendly, night time rolling house music.
I've heard quite a few GU mixes since then, but hardly ever payed serious attention to whose mix was I listening to. I do however remember, that not a single one of those CDs struck me as much as Tennaglia's work here.
The entire release gets my utmost respect for steering clear of cheesy anthemic tunes of any kind, which is something that very often gets on my nerves while listening to GU's more recent compilations. This is house music the way it's meant to be. Listen to the mix and you'll pretty much have a proper understanding of what I mean. Before the vast majority of the scene turned into a flock of dull following sheep, DJ Danny Tenaglia, one of the best in the business, showed how it's done. Hunt it down, buy it and cherish it until you die.
Timeless music, blended in a perfect mix.
onephatplanet

onephatplanet

March 27, 2003
Although I don't agree with the previous comment that Danny's 'Athens' mix is better than his 'London' mix, I will say that this is quite possibly the most cohesive set of tracks in the entire Global Underground series, with John Digweed's 'Los Angeles' mix following close behind. Danny spins us some deep, dark, shallow, and minimal-sounding records, inviting us on a journey through the subterranean. This mix, released in 1998, was a precursor to the flood of Dark Progressive House and Deep Trance tracks that would quickly surface afterwards. John Digweed seems to have been heavily influenced by Danny, releasing his "groundbreaking" (but not so groundbreaking) Global Underground 'Hong Kong' mix, mimicing the same deep and dark vibe.

Standout tracks include Scumfrog's mesmerizing 'Watersong', Miss Kittins' neurotic 'Frank Sinatra', and Tilt's ever-fascinating 'Seduction of Orpheus'. As a whole, there are few mix CDs out that are so fluid. It's almost as if Danny is weaving a story through the music he plays. Any serious listener knows that the order of the songs played AS WELL AS the track selection are what make a DJ mix great. This is what separates the amateur from the professional.

This CD is not for everyone and it's not for every occasion. Some tracks may bore the hell out of the listener with over 3 minutes of the same repetitive beats, but listen to it late at night right before bed, with all the lights out, and it will work its magic. This is a very enjoyable journey through the dark, brought to you by one of the most talented disc jockeys on the planet.
jeromy

jeromy

January 13, 2003
edited over 4 years ago

Much better than Danny's later effort "London". Athens is pure deep dirty druggy 'tribal' house music,the best representation of THE Tenaglia sound.Also contains a classic sleeve note description from Dom Philips; "Sexy,deep,dark house packed full of tracks that carry thier guns slung low.No flashy tricks just a boom and a flash and another baseline from disco hell".
As always,Dom was right on point.