Dino Valente* ‎– Dino Valente

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Versions (17)

Cat# Artist Title (Format) Label Cat# Country Year
S63443 Dino Valente* Dino Valente(LP) CBS S63443 UK 1968 Sell This Version
N18 10142 Dino Valente* Dino Valente(8-Trk, Album) Epic N18 10142 US 1968 Sell This Version
BN 26335 Dino Valenti Dino Valente(LP) Epic BN 26335 US 1968 Sell This Version
BN 26335 Dino Valente* Dino Valente(LP, Album) Epic BN 26335 US 1968 Sell This Version
BN 26335 Dino Valente* Dino Valente(LP, Album, Mono, Promo) Epic BN 26335 US 1968 Sell This Version
BN 26335 Dino Valente* Dino Valente(LP, Album, Pit) Epic BN 26335 US 1968 Sell This Version
BN 26335 Dino Valente* Dino Valente(LP, Album, Promo) Epic BN 26335 US 1968 Sell This Version
63443 Dino Valente* Dino Valente(LP, Mono) CBS 63443 UK 1968 Sell This Version
BN 26335 Dino Valente* Dino Valente(LP, Ste) Epic BN 26335 Canada 1968 Sell This Version
ESCA 7577 Dino Valente* Dino Valente(CD, Album, RE) Epic ESCA 7577 Japan 1995 Sell This Version
KOC-CD-7930 Dino Valente* Dino Valente(CD, Album, RE) Koch KOC-CD-7930 US 1998 Sell This Version
RPM 289 Dino Valente* Dino Valente(CD, Album, RE) RPM Records (2) RPM 289 UK 2004 Sell This Version
EICP 859 Dino Valente* Dino Valente(CD, Album, Ltd, RE, RM, Pap) Epic EICP 859 Japan 2007 Sell This Version
TSQ 2929 Dino Valente* Dino Valente(LP, Album, Mono, RE, RM) Tompkins Square TSQ 2929 US 2013 Sell This Version
SICP 4457 Dino Valente* Dino Valente(CD, Album, Ltd, RE, RM) Sony Music SICP 4457 Japan 2015 Sell This Version
FLOATM 6291 Dino Valente* Dino Valente(CD, Album, RE) Floating World FLOATM 6291 UK 2017 Sell This Version
BN 26335 Dino Valente* Dino Valente(LP, Album, Mono, RE, Unofficial) Epic (2) BN 26335 US Unknown Sell This Version

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sdvikingmac

sdvikingmac

July 12, 2019
referencing Dino Valente, LP, S63443
If you're expecting music similar to early Quicksilver Messenger Service and you don't like Dino Valente's later contributions to QMS, there would be no reason to expect you'd like this. However, if you like his vocals (e.g., listen to the well-known 'Fresh Air', from QMS's 1970s 'Just For Love') and you like singer-songwriter style music, I highly recommend this album, as well as the Dino Valenti 'Get Together...The Lost Recordings'.
ace2prime

ace2prime

December 17, 2018
referencing Dino Valente, LP, S63443
I bought this album thinking it would similar to the early Quicksilver Messenger Service. I was completely wrong. This album is lifeless and so boring that I kept following asleep while listening. Do yourself a favor and avoid this one.
streetmouse

streetmouse

March 25, 2017
referencing Dino Valente, LP, Album, BN 26335

To say that Dino Valente had his share of issues would be a world class understatement. Sure, mot people were instantly attracted to him due to his work with Quicksilver Messenger Service, though fans of that band quickly discovered that what was offered on this solo outing was rather confused and lacked any real structures other than his personification and attempt to ride the same atmospheric wave as Mr. Dylan.

One would instantly consider that the reverb and echo drenched songs on this album were a product of the times, filled with electronic inspiration, though truth be told Valente dose not have a good voice, and these effects where used to mask that attribute in much the same way as auto tuning is used today … with this aspect causing me to scratch my head wondering why people purchase the music of these artists, as their shortcomings are fooling no one. Of course [laughing], I remember this album being handed to me with the person at the other end of the exchange saying, “He sounds so dark and mysterious.” Another artist who came off in this manner, from the same San Francisco time period was Skip Spence, where I would have dreaded seeing these two folky psychedelic minstrels on the same bill, and even worse, opening for Tom Rush. With that in mind, Valente’s music is filled with moody self indulgent textures and is directionally and lyrically vague; to the point where when the song ends, one is left wondering what the song, yet along the album was about in the beginning.

Had it not been for this artist’s legendary history [he wrote the song “Get Together” that the Youngbloods made infamous], he would certainly be relegated to the coffee house scene, with a record deal forever alluding him, where you’d find a socially dazed individual holding his twelve string guitar backstage as if it were his only friend [and probably was] staring at the wall, waiting for the his set to begin. His songs are filled with a sense of loss, venerability, the inability to hold back the hands of time [no doubt due to the eleven months he spent in jail on a drug bust, and worsened by his anti-government stand], especially on the track “Time.” This is a man who attempted to create a new image and persona for himself by changing his name, only to have that false persona stolen from him by the record label when they spelled his name incorrectly, more than suggesting that his life was laced with insecurities and a failure to understand his true nature. His name was actually Chester Powers, with Valente intended to be spelled Valenti, so it must have been both painful and frustrating for him to never be able to become an actualized person. Considering this, other songs are locked into a forever sense of ‘now,’ displaying a lack of trust, weighted down by a past he can not shake or step out of, calling to mind some of the solo work done by Syd Barrett.

All and all, it’s an odd bag of psychedelic folk that lacked any commercial susses, which in turn only made things worse for this artist who died at 51, continually getting shots, yet never making the mark, while others [such as The Youngbloods] stood on his shoulders and had huge successes. If you think this music suits your shoes, there’s a compilation of lost recordings, or at least that’s what they’re being called, where you are able to hear his take on several legendary songs, including “Get Together” and “Midnight Rider” … a collection of songs that’s hands down far better that this CBS solo recording from 1968. So grab that and let this one dust over.

*** The Fun Facts: His 1964 song “Birdses” was the inspiration for Gene Clark to call his new band The Birdses, though changed it for a more Dylan-ish creation, to The Byrds.

Review by Jenell Kesler