Dire Straits ‎– Dire Straits

Label:
Vertigo ‎– 9102 021
Format:
Vinyl, LP, Album
Country:
Released:
Genre:
Style:

Companies, etc.

Credits

Notes

Recorded at Basing St. Studios, London, Feb. 1978.
For Charlie Gillet.
Thank you Robert Allan.

All titles: Rondor M./Straitjacket Songs.

℗ 1978 Phonogram Ltd. Made in England.
Marketed by Phonogram. © Phonogram Ltd.

The record label address is present below the corporate logo on the rear cover.
The inner sleeve with lyrics and pics is in heavy cardboard.

Barcode and Other Identifiers

  • Matrix / Runout (Side A, stamped, Variant 1): 9102021 1Y // 4 ▽420 04 18 21
  • Matrix / Runout (Side B, stamped, Variant 1): 9102021 2Y // 5 ▽420 04 18 15
  • Matrix / Runout (Side A, stamped, Variant 2): 9102021 1Y // 4 ▽420 04 18
  • Matrix / Runout (Side B, stamped, Variant 2): 9102021 2Y // 5 ▽420 04 17 24
  • Matrix / Runout (Side A, stamped, Variant 3): 9102021 1Y // 4 ▽420 04 16
  • Matrix / Runout (Side B, stamped, Variant 3): 9102021 2Y // 5 ▽ 420 04 16
  • Matrix / Runout (Side A, stamped, Variant 4): 9102021 2Y // 5 ▽ 420 04 11 32
  • Matrix / Runout (Side B, stamped, Variant 4): 9102021 2Y // 5 ▽ 420 04 11 20
  • Matrix / Runout (Side A, stamped, Variant 5): 9102021 1 Y // 4 ▽420 04 2 4
  • Matrix / Runout (Side B, stamped, Variant 5): 9102021 2 Y // 5 ▽420 04 11 12
  • Matrix / Runout (Side A, stamped, Variant 6): 9102021 1Y // 4 ▽420 04 11 8
  • Matrix / Runout (Side B, stamped, Variant 6): 9102021 2Y // 5 ▽420 04 11 9
  • Matrix / Runout (Side A, stamped, Variant 7): 9102021 1Y // 5 ▽ E 420 11 1
  • Matrix / Runout (Side B, stamped, Variant 7): 9102021 2Y // 5 ▽ 420 04 16 2 4
  • Matrix / Runout (Side A, stamped, Variant 8): 9102021 1Y//4▽420 04 12
  • Matrix / Runout (Side B, stamped, Variant 8): 9102021 2Y//5▽420 04 14 4
  • Matrix / Runout (Side A, stamped, Variant 9): 9102021 1Y//4▽420 04 1 7 4
  • Matrix / Runout (Side B, stamped, Variant 9): 9102021 2Y//5▽420 04 1 5 11

Other Versions (5 of 271) View All

Cat# Artist Title (Format) Label Cat# Country Year
BSK 3266 Dire Straits Dire Straits(LP, Album, Win) Warner Bros. Records BSK 3266 US 1978 Sell This Version
800 051-2 Dire Straits Dire Straits(CD, Album, RE, RP) Vertigo 800 051-2 Europe Unknown Sell This Version
SRM-1-1197 Dire Straits Dire Straits(LP, Album) Mercury SRM-1-1197 Canada Unknown Sell This Version
BSK 3266 Dire Straits Dire Straits(LP, Album, Jac) Warner Bros. Records BSK 3266 US 1978 Sell This Version
MC8-1-1197 Dire Straits Dire Straits(8-Trk) Mercury MC8-1-1197 Canada 1978 Sell This Version

Recommendations

Reviews Show All 7 Reviews

Add Review

vertino

vertino

April 18, 2019
A: BSK-1-3266 WW2 #5 -------◁
B: BSK-1-3266 WW3 #3 -------◁
bedfordtim

bedfordtim

February 20, 2019
Missing inner Lyric sheet slightly grubby sleeve record looks virtually scratch free.
vgonis

vgonis

May 31, 2018
a mature debut that surprised the punk world

Mark Knopfler ranks among the best guitarists in the world, along with Eric Clapton, Jeff Beck, Jimi Hendrix, Steve Cropper, Peter Green and others, too many to mention. His status as a composer (for soundtracks as well), producer and guest musician has grown over the years. The only difference with the other guitarists is that his rise to stardom started when he was 29 years old, in 1977, more than a decade after all the other guitarists had made it big. And it started with this very record, in the middle of the punk era.
Music critics in the U.K. didn’t get it at first, and ignored it. It had to be a major hit in the U.S.A., first, before they recognized the value of the record. Then trying to label it somehow, in order to sell it, they compared the virtues of the music with the ones found in a Bob Dylan and a J.J. Cale album. Although the similarities do exist and, after all, it is a great compliment to compare you with such established musicians, the point is that none of them had the authenticity of Knopfler's guitar playing. His playing made him a household name from the very beginning (Steely Dan, Bob Dylan, Mavis Staple asked for his guitar work, before the release of Dire straits' second album) and eventually a guitar hero, in an era that dismissed all such heroes.
Of course the luck factor for a music band is very important, even if they are always ready, and they were pretty lucky in a sense. Their demo tape was sent to the late Charlie Gillett, a radio producer, who was so amazed by a song that he played it over and over during his radio hour. The executives/scouts of the record industry had their ears open and it was only a matter of time for one of the major labels to sign them.
The song in question was no other than "Sultans of swing", which is such a classic that needs no other introduction. The rest of the songs are marvelous showcases of sincere songwriting and brilliant musicianship. "Down to the waterline", the opener of the album is another classic, showcasing the abilities of the band, for upbeat songs. The album is filled with slower paced songs (with the exception of “Southbound again”), that gave many reasons to the critics, to label them a “pub” band.
Stories of people in dire straits - the financial state they were in, was terrible and thus they didn’t have to look any further for a name- (“Southbound again”), people in love and despair (“Six blade Knife”,“Setting me up”,“Water of love”), the problems of finding your way through the world with jobs and arts (“In the gallery”) and last but not least scenes of everyday life (“Wild West End”, “Lions”) .All these lyrics were crafted so carefully and narrated with such fluency that they work even without the music.
But it was the same case, with the similarities with Dylan and J.J. Cale, when critics called them a “pub” band.Critics failed to see that all the similarities with types of music and musicians were totally superficial. The key element that everybody heard but refused to admit was the unique guitar work. Finger picking was never so inspired in rock. Even Clapton, in his autobiography admitted, upon listening to Mark Knopfler, that he feared his star would eclipse.
Only “Sultans of swing” have remained in Dire straits’ live playlist by 1994, but somehow it was the only fitting song that has changed and expanded, in order to be the centerpiece of their live act. The rest, are songs that are best appreciated in the peace and quiet of your home.A masterpiece

1 of 1 found this helpful
JM92

JM92

March 13, 2016

Great guitarwork throughout, the record manages to maintain a mood beginning to end giving this work a great cohesion.
marko.krejic

marko.krejic

February 6, 2016

Great album where Mark shows how to handle the guitar. I didn't discover this album until recently and was a real nice find. Who needs the new stuff...
Kgbow

Kgbow

October 18, 2015

Awesome introduction to the world of Dire Straits. You can't put this music into a genre.... it's just Dire Straits.
vgonis

vgonis

November 13, 2012
Mark Knopfler ranks among the best guitarists in the world, along with Eric Clapton, Jeff Beck, Jimi Hendrix, Steve Cropper, Peter Green and others, far too many to mention. His status as a composer (for soundtracks, as well), producer, sideman and guest musician has grown over the years. The only difference with the other guitarists is that his rise to stardom started when he was 29 years old, in 1977, more than a decade after all the other guitarists had made it big. And it started with this very record, in the middle of the punk era.
Music critics in the U.K. didn’t get it at first, and ignored it. It had to be a major hit in the U.S.A., first, before they recognized the value of the record. Then trying to label it somehow, in order to sell it, they compared the virtues of the music with the ones found in a Bob Dylan and a J.J. Cale album. Although the similarities do exist and, after all, it is a great compliment to compare you with such established musicians, the point is that none of them had the authenticity of Knopfler's guitar playing. His playing made him a household name from the very beginning (Steely Dan, Bob Dylan, Mavis Staple asked for his guitar work, before the release of Dire straits' second album) and eventually a guitar hero, in an era that dismissed all such heroes.
Of course the luck factor for a music band is very important, even if they are always ready, and they were pretty lucky in a sense. Their demo tape was sent to the late Charlie Gillett, a radio producer, who was so amazed by a song that he played it over and over during his radio hour. The executives/scouts of the record industry had their ears open and it was only a matter of time for one of the major labels to sign them.
The song in question was no other than "Sultans of swing", which is such a classic that needs no other introduction. The rest of the songs are marvelous showcases of sincere songwriting and brilliant musicianship. "Down to the waterline", the opener of the album is another classic, showcasing the abilities of the band, for upbeat songs. The rest of the album is filled with slower paced songs (with the exception of “Southbound again”), that gave many reasons to the critics, to label them a “pub” band.
Stories of people in dire straits - the financial state they were in, was terrible and thus they didn’t have to look any further for a name- (“Southbound again”), people in love and despair (“Six blade Knife”, “Setting me up”, “Water of love”), the problems of finding your way through the world with jobs and arts (“In the gallery”) and last but not least scenes of everyday life (“Wild West End”, “Lions”) .All these lyrics were crafted so carefully and narrated with such fluency that they work even without the music.
But it was the same case, with the similarities with Dylan and J.J. Cale, when critics called them a “pub” band.Critics failed to see that all the similarities with types of music and musicians were totally superficial. The key element that everybody heard but refused to admit was the unique guitar work. Finger picking was never so inspired in rock. Even Eric Clapton, in his autobiography admitted, upon listening to Mark Knopfler, that he feared his star would eclipse.
Only “Sultans of swing” have remained in Dire straits’ live playlist in 1994, but somehow it is the only fitting song that has changed and expanded, in order to be the centerpiece of their live act. The rest, are songs that are best appreciated in the peace and quiet of your own place.
A true masterpiece.