Dunkelziffer ‎– In The Night

Label:
FünfUndVierzig ‎– FÜNFUNDVIERZIG 02
Format:
CD, Album, Reissue
Country:
Released:
Genre:
Style:

Tracklist

Companies, etc.

Credits

Notes

Recorded and mixed at Mascot Studio, Köln, August 1984.
Made in Germany

Packaging: standard jewel case with 4 page booklet

Barcode and Other Identifiers

  • Barcode: 0718750450227
  • Matrix / Runout: CDT-BERLIN EFA 04502 01
  • Rights Society: GEMA
  • Label Code: LC 8759

Other Versions (5 of 7) View All

Cat# Artist Title (Format) Label Cat# Country Year
Efa 12-4502 Dunkelziffer In The Night(LP, Album) Fünfundvierzig, Fuego Efa 12-4502 Germany 1984 Sell This Version
none Dunkelziffer In The Night(CDr, Album, Ltd, Unofficial) G. & P. Essential Music none Russia Unknown Sell This Version
Efa 12-4502 Dunkelziffer In The Night(LP, Album) Fünfundvierzig, Fuego Efa 12-4502 Germany 1984 Sell This Version
Fünfundvierzig 02, CTCD-059 Dunkelziffer In The Night(CD, Album) FünfUndVierzig, Captain Trip Records Fünfundvierzig 02, CTCD-059 Germany 1991 Sell This Version
Efa 12-4502 Dunkelziffer In The Night(LP, Album) Fünfundvierzig, Fuego Efa 12-4502 Germany 1984 Sell This Version

Reviews

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bonnicon

bonnicon

May 21, 2012
It can hardly be denied that CAN were a band of real importance in the influencing and development of this music scene. All of the original Industrial musicians of any worth quoted CAN to have been a major source of inspiration. Damo Suzuki, ex- of CAN is the vocalist in this obviously 'influenced' band, and that's not where the connection ends.
The opening track "Retrospective" is nearly 13½ minutes of CAN-inflenced rhythm, repetitive, insistant yet hardly pushing boundries. Wolfgang Schubert's sax dominates large parts of this sound, creating the actual tune while the others keep the rhythm going. There's a nice bright, shimmering organsound in this. The vocalist on this track (I don't think it's Suzuki) sounds not unlike JIM MORRISON. "Sunday Morning" follows this, opening to harp glissandos over a continuously chugging rhythm which transforms into a fairly weak piece of music. "Watch On My Head" is a Reggae track, and they cope with this type of music well - it's a nice slow skank. The vocals on this track are decidedly odd - not muffled so much as strangely muted. Next up is "Q" - a piece of Jazz with an odd metre - sax heavy again. It twists into something again midway through, again Jazzy, but this time a vocal piece. Next up is probably the closest to CAN that actually appears or this album - a strange little piece if ever there was one - it's called "(Do What You Can) Prof" and is a dense piece of music. "I See Your Smile" visits Reggae again - a light-weight track, catchy but hardly classic. The album closes with "Oriental Cafe" which clicks in at just over 10 minutes long - an Eastern-flavoured track, composed yet meandering.

This album has little that really jumps out and bites you - it's all well played, but a little too mellow and mild for me. If you're a CAN fan and want to complete your set, then give it a go.

Originally reviewed for Soft Watch.