Electronic ‎– Getting Away With It...

Label:
Factory ‎– Facd257
Format:
CD, Single
Country:
Released:
Genre:
Style:

Tracklist

1 Getting Away With It... (Full Length) 4:23
2 Getting Away With It... (Instrumental) 5:13
3 Getting Away With It... (Extended Version) 7:33

Companies, etc.

Credits

Notes

"Getting away with it... Electronic!"

Insert:
Neil Tennant appears courtesy of Parlophone Records.
This is a CLEAR recording licensed in the UK to Factory Communications Ltd.
A Factory Record
© 1989 Factory Communications Ltd
Photography - The Image Bank, London.

Disc:
Published by Warner Chappell/Cage Music Ltd./10 Music Ltd.
A Factory Compact Disc
© 1989 Factory Communications Ltd.
℗ 1989 Factory Communications Ltd.

Barcode and Other Identifiers

  • Barcode: 5 016839 502573
  • Matrix / Runout (Variant 1): FACD 257 : MASTERED BY NIMBUS
  • Matrix / Runout (Variant 2): FACD 257 . 2:6 MASTERED BY NIMBUS

Other Versions (5 of 31) View All

Cat# Artist Title (Format) Label Cat# Country Year
Fac257/7 Electronic Getting Away With It...(7", Single, Pap) Factory Fac257/7 UK 1989 Sell This Version
91 98804 Electronic Getting Away With It... Cassette Single!(Cass, Single) Warner Bros. Records 91 98804 Canada 1990 Sell This Version
Fac257c Electronic Getting Away With It...(Cass, Single) Factory Fac257c UK 1989 Sell This Version
9 21498-4, 4-21498 Electronic Getting Away With It... Cassette Maxi-Single!(Cass, Maxi, AR,) Warner Bros. Records, Warner Bros. Records 9 21498-4, 4-21498 US 1990 Sell This Version
543919880-7 Electronic Getting Away With It...(7", Single) Warner Bros. Records 543919880-7 Australia 1990 Sell This Version

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onelittle

onelittle

December 16, 2005
edited over 11 years ago

7 reasons why Getting Away With It… is perfect pop.

Reason #1: it's all about the ellipsis in the title…

Reason #2: the song opens on such a dream of a bassline fidgeting under a swathe of strings. Barney sings "I've been walking in the rain just to get wet on purpose", and lisps the ess in the laziest of shrugs.

Reason #3: forty-five seconds in, a spectre of Neil Tennants loom over the chorus. Tennant, in the Dusty-est of traditions, is multitracked approx eighty-nine times - atonally. This is pop genius.

Reason #4: "However I look it's clear to see, I love you more than you love me"

Reason #5: verse two; Johnny Marr cuts Chic-ly at his guitar and the cellos chop as Barney sniffs "I hate that mirror, it makes me feel so worthless". As the bassline slouches, Marr's mogadon flamenco dodges the poison arrows of Dudley's strings; it's heavenly.

Reason #6: the singles' artwork (a somewhat lazy reappropriaton of stock photography) was the start of Saville's descent into the Mac trap. But! Not only is the barcode the most perfectly positioned barcode ever, the hidden verso of the inlay is printed blood red. You might not understand how important this is - trust me, it is.

Reason #7: it's only 4:21 seconds long. It's only a pop song. But somehow this song has lived in my life for over 16 years. When I'm happy, it sings my happiness back at me. When I am blue, it cries too. It can sound slightly concerned. It often sounds like it doesn't have a care in its world. It has a swagger. It's such a perfect sigh of a song.