Essen ‎– King Size Blues

Label:
Clean Up Records ‎– CUP024CD
Format:
CD, Album
Country:
Released:
Genre:
Style:

Tracklist Hide Credits

1 King Size Blues
Bass [Live] – Christiano Americo SossiDrums [Live] – Fabio Abeni
4:11
2 God & The Devil 8:26
3 Cover Me 5:16
4 Sleep 6:56
5 King Of The Rain 5:47
6 The Vision
Bass [Live] – Christiano Americo SossiDrums [Live] – Fabio Abeni
5:39
7 Rams Red Son 8:12
8 Her Favour
Bass [Live] – Christiano Americo SossiDrums [Live] – Fabio Abeni
3:46
9 Beautiful 6:12
10 Defend 7:03
11 Amen
Vocals [Additional] – Joan DaCosta Robinson
8:29

Credits

Notes

All tracks written, arranged, produced and mixed @ Essencore HQ, Ladbroke Grove.
Mastered @ The Exchange.

℗ 1998 Clean Up Records Ltd. © 1998 Clean Up Records Ltd.

Issued in a standard jewel case with six page foldout booklet.

Barcode and Other Identifiers

  • Barcode: 5 029271 002426

Other Versions (1 of 1) View All

Cat# Artist Title (Format) Label Cat# Country Year
7243 8 46365 2 4 Essen King Size Blues(CD, Album) Virgin 7243 8 46365 2 4 Europe 1998 Sell This Version

Reviews

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scoundrel

scoundrel

August 17, 2013

Dark and mysteriuos, Essen's album KING SIZE BLUES, dropped right during the heyday of trip-hop, and though it fits in that category, it's blues rock leanings help to keep it fresh. The title track, for instance, has hints of Middle Eastern melodies (the ethnic percussion becomes more evience in the jazzed-down "King of the Rain") amongst the instrumental layers. A similar haze hovers of "God & the Devil," which is less concerned with spiritual matters and more with moody funk. A paranoiac rhythm takes center stage on "Cover Me," while "Sleep" wanders about like a somnambulist. The Native American chanting that kicks off "Rams Red Son" continues the international musical pillaging, though it's just a hint in an otherwise funky track. The mood and tone of the album stays perhaps a little too consistent -- one could say repetitive, but moments do break through, like how the instrumental "Beautiful" piles on the sounds for a dense atmosphere. "Amen" closes the album, not on a spiritual note, but with a deep, dark baseline and some skittering breaks. A lesser-known work, but a worthwhile one.