GusGus ‎– 24/7

Label:
Kompakt ‎– KOMPAKT CD 73, Kompakt ‎– KOMPAKT CD73
Format:
CD, Album, Digipak
Country:
Released:
Genre:
Style:

Companies, etc.

Credits

Notes

Recorded At Tankurinn, Flateyri - Iceland. Mastered at Kompakt Studio 3.
Issued as a 6-panel Digipak.

The backing vocals credit for track 6 is mentioned twice (differently) on the release: once for GusGus and once for Birgir Þórarinsson.

Publishing: GusGus by Great Stuff Music Publishing/Universal. Aaron-Carl published by Symphonic Storm Music Publishing (BMI), Jimi Tenor published by EMI/Warp.

Barcode and Other Identifiers

  • Barcode (Text): 8 80319 03952 2
  • Barcode (Scanned): 880319039522
  • Label Code: LC 12012
  • Matrix / Runout (Variant 1 & 2): CA KOMCD73 @ 07/22/09 08:35:21 PM
  • Mastering SID Code (Variant 1 & 2): IFPI L039
  • Mould SID Code (Variant 1): IFPI 1281
  • Mould SID Code (Variant 2): IFPI 1284
  • Rights Society: GEMA

Other Versions (5 of 9) View All

Cat# Artist Title (Format) Label Cat# Country Year
KOM 197 Gus Gus* 24/7(2x12", Album, RE) Kompakt KOM 197 Germany Unknown Sell This Version
SM156CD GusGus 24/7(CD, Album) Smekkleysa SM156CD Iceland 2009 Sell This Version
R47 GusGus 24/7(CD, Album, Dig) No Paper Records R47 Poland 2014 Sell This Version
KOM 197 Gus Gus* 24/7(2x12", Album + CD, Album) Kompakt KOM 197 Germany 2009 Sell This Version
KOMPAKT CD 73, KOMPAKT CD73 GusGus 24/7(CD, Album, Unofficial) Kompakt (2), Kompakt (2) KOMPAKT CD 73, KOMPAKT CD73 Russia 2009 Sell This Version

Recommendations

Reviews Show All 4 Reviews

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scoundrel

scoundrel

September 7, 2011

Gus Gus moves to the Kompakt camp with their latest, 24/7, but if anything, it almost feels like a return to their earliest album, POLYESTERDAY. The extended grooves are back (this time with more minimal techno than trip-hop), but this won't come as a surprise to those who follow Gus Gus' remixing efforts. Indeed, they're much darker here than on any of their earlier efforts: "Hateful" is a deep, funky war song, while "Thin Ice" exhorts people to dance rather dangerously. Daníel Ágúst makes a welcome return as the main vocalist, as well. The extended grooves are a bit too extended, however, seeming to peter out in acid lines and dub effects around the halfway mark. Jimi Tenor's "Take Me Baby" gets a much shorter workout here, but if you consider how it segues into "Bremen Cowboy," it's almost another long track by itself. "Add This Song" continues this tradition: good, but perhaps overly long...
habre

habre

June 10, 2011
i've the version with label sm156cd, bought in Iceland.
fabriknos

fabriknos

June 29, 2010

I have to disagree with the gushing praise from the previous reviewer. Impressive, stunning, edgy, brilliant, amazing? This album feels like an excuse for Kompakt to release a bunch of minimal from its artists; just look at the three remix singles. Gus Gus is always unique, I will give them that, but this trendy minimal/tech house sound does not suit them. All that dub delay in every track can't hide what is essentially mediocre dance music. What little "amazing sound tricks" I hear are totally overshadowed by uninteresting synth sounds and song structures.

Gus Gs vs. T-World was actually a great foray into the techno world - very believable, engaging and creative - but 24/7 completely lacks that impact. I suppose if you like minimal, especially with vocals, you'll like this, but I have to have more meat in my dance music.
Crijevo

Crijevo

June 27, 2010
edited 12 months ago
Since they turned towards ear-splitting dance music with "Attention" in 2001, Gus Gus seem to feel quite comfortable in their own, real cool world. Both successors to "Attention" - "Forever" (2007) and the latest effort called "24/7" are no less different; this is edgy dance music to squeeze the body its last drop of sweat. However, while the group's newly established dance-phase remains technically brilliant and appealing, there is very little to relate to in terms of listening. Some find it reasonably disappointing, that such a creative force, once delivering an eclectic masterpiece called "Polydistortion", are now slaves to their own self-indulgence, imprisoned in the dancefloor frame.

If only the songs were half as short, the effect would be way more impressive. This way, it more tires than fascinates - most of the album kicks off to great effect but halfway down, it becomes just tedious exercise.