Heaven 17 ‎– The Luxury Gap

Label:
Virgin ‎– V2253, Virgin ‎– V 2253
Format:
Vinyl, LP, Album, EMI Pressing
Country:
Released:
Genre:
Style:

Tracklist

A1 Crushed By The Wheels Of Industry 5:51
A2 Who'll Stop The Rain 3:02
A3 Let Me Go 4:21
A4 Key To The World 3:43
B1 Temptation 3:31
B2 Come Live With Me 4:02
B3 Lady Ice And Mr Hex 3:47
B4 We Live So Fast 3:47
B5 The Best Kept Secret 5:10

Companies, etc.

Credits

Notes

Catalog number on sleeve: V2253
Catalog number on labels: V 2253

Exactly the same as The Luxury Gap except for the difference in pressing plant.

Karol Kenyon appears courtesy of A & M Records Ltd.

Another B.E.F. Production.

℗ 1982 Virgin Records Ltd.
© 1983 Virgin Records Ltd.

Includes a printed inner sleeve with lyrics, credits and selected BEF/Heaven 17 discography. Some copies came with a light blue outer sleeve spine instead of the usual purple spine.

Barcode and Other Identifiers

  • Matrix / Runout (A-side label): V 2253-A
  • Matrix / Runout (B-side label): V 2253-B
  • Matrix / Runout (A-side runout - Variant 1): V 2253 A-1-1-1-2
  • Matrix / Runout (B-side runout - Variant 1): V 2253 B-1-1-1-6
  • Matrix / Runout (A-side runout - Variant 2): V 2253 A-1-1-2-8
  • Matrix / Runout (B-side runout - Variant 2): V 2253 B-1-1-1-8

Other Versions (5 of 55) View All

Cat# Artist Title (Format) Label Cat# Country Year
VIL-6041, VIRG-6041 Heaven 17 The Luxury Gap(LP, Album, Promo) Virgin, Virgin VIL-6041, VIRG-6041 Japan 1983 Sell This Version
AL 8-8020 Heaven 17 The Luxury Gap(LP, Album) Arista AL 8-8020 US 1983 Sell This Version
ATC 9628 Heaven 17 The Luxury Gap(Cass, Album, Dol) Virgin ATC 9628 US 1983 Sell This Version
46 957 7 Heaven 17 The Luxury Gap(LP, Album, Club) Virgin 46 957 7 Germany 1983 Sell This Version
205 337, 205 337-320 Heaven 17 The Luxury Gap(LP, Album) Virgin, Virgin 205 337, 205 337-320 Europe 1983 Sell This Version

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mundayschild

mundayschild

August 19, 2017
edited 8 months ago
Martin Rushent's Linn Drum programming on this is some of the most inventive and creative bar Trevor Horn's arrangements for Propaganda. Texturally the drum machine is centre stage and the songs seem to be built around these rock solid electronic rhythms all except for 'Lady Ice..' and 'Best Kept Secret'.
The massive sounding 'Key To The World' just booms with that huge drum sound.
Special mention also goes out to "Let Me Go" probably the first pop production to use the embryonic Acid sound of the Roland TB303.
'We Live so Fast' is all about those syncopated Linn drums again, with a decent side order of sparkling chrome synths.
I find the lyrics of 'Come Live With Me' a little dodgy, but the tune is great.
What I do like with some of the lyrics is the thinly veiled swipes at the horrors of capitalism and consumerist societal traps.
All in all this is a great 80's album which has really stood the test of time and another testament to the genius of Martin Rushent's unique production style. This and 'Dare' and to a lesser extent 'Love And Dancing' make up some of the best electronic music of that era.
Essential...
StevePowell0

StevePowell0

June 19, 2017
I love this album. I think who'll stop the rain and Let Me Go are my favourites. Its really worth putting it on and leaving it on, one of those albums that grows on you. Some beautiful vocals on this too.
Crijevo

Crijevo

August 14, 2016

"The Luxury Gap" is definitely a moment Heaven 17 were waiting for and made it big. While their debut album was still bravely crossing over into pop and experimental territory the principle core duo of Marsh and Ware pioneered when in The Human League, their second album brushed all the rough edges and delivered a stunning collection deservedly remaining in the ears (and hearts) of many.

Because, it is a true "greatest hits" collection - from "Crushed By the Wheels Of Industry" all the way through to the album's grand finale that is "The Best Kept Secret", there is this invisible yet nicely consistent storyline. While in their later years, Heaven 17 sadly lost (or simply, they willingly dropped) their electro-pop ideals for their white-soul pretenses, the group's first four albums plus "Endless" do provide an impressive catalogue, with a sophisticated pop pedigree.