Joy Division ‎– Manchester, So Much To Answer For

Label:
Interzone Records (3) ‎– INTERLP416
Format:
Vinyl, LP, Unofficial Release, Purple
Country:
 
Released:
Genre:
Style:

Tracklist

A1 Shadowplay 4:09
A2 Interzone 2:09
A3 The Drawback 1:09
A4 Insight 4:05
A5 Glass 3:28
A6 Transmission 3:51
A7 Ice Age 2:32
B1 Candidate 1:57
B2 The Only Mistake 3:42
B3 Chance (Atmosphere) 4:52
B4 Colony 4:01
B5 She's Lost Control 4:51

Companies, etc.

Notes

A1 to A3 RCA Demos 3-4 May 1978
A4 to A7 Genetic Records Sessions 4 March 1979
B1 to B3 Picadilly Radio Sessions 4 June 1979
B4 John Peel Session 26 November 1979
B5 Strawberry Studios March 1980

Interzone Records, Suite 2051A, Salford Road, Hanoi.

Also available in other vinyl colours.

Barcode and Other Identifiers

  • Matrix / Runout: JOY DIVISION MANCHESTER A
  • Matrix / Runout: JOY DIVISION MANCHESTER B

Other Versions (2 of 2) View All

Reviews

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Sonic_Birdman

Sonic_Birdman

August 29, 2009

Interesting release; I'm not quite sure what the editorial/curatorial intent was, but it appears to be an "alternate best of" of sorts (though without Love Will Tear Us Apart). It covers material that officially appeared on their Factory LPs [Unknown Pleasures, Closer, and Still], but are all alternate or unofficially released versions. The recording dates are also varied - May 1978 to March 1980. There are three tracks from the RCA "Warsaw" sessions, four from the Genetic Records sessions, three from Piccadilly radio, and a couple strays from John Peel and Strawberry. The John Peel version of Colony is easily the most outstanding here (play it REALLY loud to get the full effect), though Chance (aka Atmosphere) has a wonderfully raw vibe. Unfortunately, the last song on side one - the Genetic Records version of Ice Age - fades out early due to time restrictions. All of this material has long been previously available on any and all formats - vinyl, CD, and download. That being said, it's a nice pressing with excellent sound, has a good-looking jacket, and was reasonably priced. The opaque lavender/purple vinyl is heavy and flat, and the label mimics the font of the Factory releases. It's really one for the fans, yet is oddly appropriate for those who are new to the way of JD boots, as it covers a nice cross-section of their career output. One hopes that neophytes would enjoy it enough to dig further, while collectors will likely snag one without even batting an eye. A solid 4.0, maybe more? But not a 5.