Kenny Burrell ‎– Kenny Burrell

Label:
Blue Note ‎– TOCJ-1543
Series:
Format:
CD, Album, Reissue, Remastered, Mono
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Tracklist Hide Credits

1 Get Happy
Written-By – Harold Arlen, Koehler*
4:01
2 But Not For Me
Written-By – Gershwin*
3:47
3 Mexico City
Written-By – Kenny Dorham
6:35
4 Moten Swing
Written-By – Bennie & Buster Moten*
6:08
5 Cheeta
Written-By – Kenny Burrell
4:39
6 Now See How You Are
Written-By – Pettiford*, Harris*
5:51
7 Phinupi
Written-By – Kenny Burrell
4:41
8 How About You
Written-By – Lane*, Freed*
5:12

Companies, etc.

Credits

Notes

Recorded at the Van Gelder Studio, New Jersey on March and May, 1956 [sic].

HSE2088 (20bit 88.2kHz Mastering)

Barcode and Other Identifiers

  • Barcode: 4988006715370
  • Rights Society: JASRAC

Other Versions (5 of 18) View All

Cat# Artist Title (Format) Label Cat# Country Year
BLP 1543 Kenny Burrell Kenny Burrell(LP, Album, Mono) Blue Note BLP 1543 US 1956 Sell This Version
BN 1543 Kenny Burrell Kenny Burrell(LP, Album, Mono, RE) Blue Note BN 1543 Japan 1989 Sell This Version
BLP 1543 Kenny Burrell Kenny Burrell(LP, Album, Mono, RE, Mic) Blue Note BLP 1543 US Unknown Sell This Version
LNJ-70129 Kenny Burrell Kenny Burrell(LP, Album, Mono) Blue Note LNJ-70129 Japan 1976 Sell This Version
BLP 1543 Kenny Burrell Kenny Burrell(LP, Album, Mono) Blue Note BLP 1543 US Unknown Sell This Version

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Reviews

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Shrdlu

Shrdlu

April 9, 2018
This is an excellent album, in the true meaning of the word "album".

Normally, in this age of reissues and "the complete recordings of John Doe for the Blah Blah label", I arrange all the tracks in order of recording. This is especially needed for Mosaic sets. Michael Cuscuna always arranges those so that you have to go hunting for alternate takes, which are almost hidden at the ends of CDs. As a result, I have to rip and burn the entire set, to get the music organised properly. The most recent Basie/Young set was particularly hard to arrange in order.

Now, Michael issued a 2 CD set called "The Complete Introducing Sessions", consisting of Kenny Burrell's first two Blue Note LPs (1523 and 1543), one omitted track from the first session, and a rare session with Hank Mobley which only appeared on a Japanese vinyl LP. As always, the tracks were scattered around and had to be rearranged.

Another Cuscuna problem is his very frequent use of Ron McMaster to do the mixing. McMaster occasionally produces an acceptable CD, but most of them have poor sound, so many of us Blue Note collectors have to spend extra money to get a Japanese CD. The 2 CD Burrell set suffers from this.

So, I ordered the "Blue Note Works" CD of "Kenny Burrell, Volume 2" (BLP 1543), because it has some favorite tracks on it. This Blue Note series has by far the best sounding Blue Note CD reissues, and should be made permanently available. (In fact, it is a rule that Japanese CD reissues of jazz albums are always much better than American ones. I don't know why, and I don't know why the American remasterers don't find out what the Japanese have done, and do the same.)

This "Blue Note Works" CD has, as always, excellent, clear sound. With this series, you can forget about technical matters and relax and enjoy the music.

My main point is that Alfred Lion did an excellent job when he compiled this album. It all fits together well, even though the tracks come from three different sessions, including a track on which Kenny was not the leader. For once, the original album order is better than the tracks in chronological order.

The entire impression is of a collection of musicians assembled to back Kenny up. This applies to the Kenny Dorham group's track, "Mexico City". That was obviously intended to be a special feature for Kenny, who makes the most of it, with a long, blistering solo; the tenor saxophone player did not solo, in order to make room for Kenny.

I strongly recommend this album (in its Japanese version), both as a fine album in its own right, and also as an introduction to Kenny for anyone who hasn't heard him.

My favorite moment (don't miss this!) is at the start of "Moten Swing". The great Tommy Flanagan plays some delightful, warm chords at the very start. This is as good as it gets.