Kings Of Convenience ‎– Quiet Is The New Loud

Label:
Source ‎– SOURCD019, Source ‎– 7243 5 29072 2 9, Source ‎– SOURCD 019, Source ‎– 7243 529072 2 9
Format:
CD, Album
Country:
Released:
Genre:
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Tracklist Hide Credits

1 Winning A Battle, Losing The War
Cello – Matt McGeever
3:51
2 Toxic Girl 3:07
3 Singing Softly To Me
Trumpet – Ben Dumville
3:01
4 I Don't Know What I Can Save You From
Cello – Ian Bracken
4:34
5 Failure
Cello – Ian BrackenDrums [Drum Fills] – Tarjei StrømLead Vocals – Erlend Øye
3:31
6 The Weight Of My Words 4:04
7 The Girl From Back Then 2:28
8 Leaning Against The Wall
Cello – Ian Bracken
3:16
9 Little Kids 3:43
10 Summer On The Westhill
Cello – Ian Bracken
4:30
11 The Passenger 3:10
12 Parallel Lines 5:11

Companies, etc.

Credits

Notes

This is the EMI Uden edition of the album. The other versions with the same catalog numbers:

Quiet Is The New Loud is made by EMI UK
Quiet Is The New Loud is made by Arvato

This album was recorded and mixed at Parr Street Studios, Liverpool on a Studer 24-track analogue 2inch tape machine.
It was then mixed to 1/2 inch tape through a Neve Legend mixing desk.
Tracks 2 & 5 were originally recorded and edited at Ornkli Studios in Bergen, Norway.
Further recordings and the final mixing of these tracks were done in Parr Street.
Mastered at Abbey Road.

"Singing Softly To Me" and "The Girl From Back Then" are parts 1 & 2 of the same song.

Back cover:
(P) 2001 The copyright in this sound recording is owned by Mawlaw 388 Ltd T/A Source (UK).
(C) 2001 Mawlaw Ltd Trading as Source (UK).
All songs published by BMG Music Publishing.
Printed in EU

CD face:
(P) 2001 The copyright in this sound recording is owned by Mawlaw 388 Ltd T/A Source (UK).
(C) 2001 Mawlaw Ltd Trading as Source (UK).
Made in EU.

Barcode and Other Identifiers

  • Barcode (Text): 7 24352 90722 9
  • Barcode (Scanned): 724352907229
  • Rights Society: bel BIEM
  • Label Code: LC 0901
  • Other (Distribution code, F): PM 502
  • Matrix / Runout (Variant 1): EMI uDEN 5290722 @ 3
  • Mastering SID Code (Variant 1): IFPI L047
  • Mould SID Code (Variant 1): ifpi 153B
  • Matrix / Runout (Variant 2): EMI uDEN 5290722 @ 3 1-1-7-NL
  • Mastering SID Code (Variant 2): IFPI L047
  • Mould SID Code (Variant 2): ifpi 15CC
  • Matrix / Runout (Variant 3): EMI uDEN 5290722 @ 3 1-1-10-NL
  • Mastering SID Code (Variant 3): IFPI L047
  • Mould SID Code (Variant 3): ifpi 1548
  • Matrix / Runout (Variant 4): EMI uDEN 5290722 @ 3 1-1-2-NL
  • Mastering SID Code (Variant 4): IFPI L047
  • Mould SID Code (Variant 4): ifpi 15DF
  • Matrix / Runout (Variant 5): EMI uDEN 5290722 @ 3 1-1-14-NL
  • Mastering SID Code (Variant 5): IFPI L047
  • Mould SID Code (Variant 5): ifpi 1538

Other Versions (5 of 14) View All

Cat# Artist Title (Format) Label Cat# Country Year
SOURCD019, 7243 5 29072 29 Kings Of Convenience Quiet Is The New Loud(CD, Album) Source, Source SOURCD019, 7243 5 29072 29 Europe 2001 Sell This Version
2547762207 Kings Of Convenience Quiet Is The New Loud(LP, Album, Ltd, RE, Blu) Astralwerks 2547762207 US 2016 Sell This Version
SOURCD019, 7243 5 29072 2 9 Kings Of Convenience Quiet Is The New Loud(CD, Album) Source, Source SOURCD019, 7243 5 29072 2 9 UK & Europe 2001 Sell This Version
SOURCD019, 7243 5 29072 2 9 Kings Of Convenience Quiet Is The New Loud(CD, Album, RE) Source, Source SOURCD019, 7243 5 29072 2 9 UK & Europe Unknown Sell This Version
SOURCDP019, VISA 6292 Kings Of Convenience Quiet Is The New Loud(CD, Album, Promo) Source, Source SOURCDP019, VISA 6292 Europe 2001 Sell This Version

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Reviews Show All 2 Reviews

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wilberforce

wilberforce

August 30, 2010
edited over 6 years ago
About seven years ago or so an old friend gave me a cassette of a Jim O'Rourke album thinking it to be to my taste. Unfortunately that wasn't so, but out of curiosity I flipped the unmarked tape and started playing the other side. My ears instantly pricked up at the delicate and intricate acoustic stylings and sensitive vocals, and by the end of track two I was completely hooked.

My first thoughts were that it was perhaps some undiscovered/obscure act from the 70's (there was nothing in the production to suggest otherwise), so I was most surprised to discover that this was very much a contemporary recording, as by that time I was totally despairing that popular music had anything fresh or different to offer. Sure, it has shades of Nick Drake, Simon and Garfunkel, and Crosby Stills & Nash about it (which isn't a bad thing of course), but unlike said artists, in my view these guys' output is consistently listenable with their own unique spin (that perhaps comes through emanating from a part of the world not renowned for its musical output).

There are very few albums I've heard that I can justify listening to from beginning to end without skipping tracks, but this is one of them, or at least the nearest it gets for me (perhaps one or two songs could have been developed a bit more, but I'm a hard person to please). Highlights range from the comparatively rhythmically upbeat "Toxic Girl" to the introspective picking of "The Weight Of My Words", but the wonderful conclusion is a masterful triptych that should be heard as programmed. Smouldering, wistful, melancholic, elegiac - describe it how you like but as far as acoustic pop is concerned in my opinion it doesn't get much better than this.
scoundrel

scoundrel

August 2, 2004
edited over 13 years ago

Absolutely gorgeous. Though the Kings of Convenience's first album is not "electronic" in the strictest sense (or in any sense), there's still no denying the utter beauty of this album. The first track on the album, "Winning a Battle, Losing the War," is my favorite, full of shimmering guitars and pensive lyrics; the track doesn't explodes as much as it blossoms right at the end. "Singing Softly to Me" throws in some trumpet to emphasize the call-and-response of the song, while "I Don't Know What I Can Save You From" adds a mournful cello towards the end, as if underlining the futility of the situation. The haunting melodies and the powerful lyrics get under your skin and stick in your head. An underlying melancholy lies at the heart of some of the outstanding tracks like "The Weight of My Words," "Little Kids," and the powerful closing tracks, "The Passenger" and "Parallel Lines." The album titles says it all: QUIET IS THE NEW LOUD.