Klimperei ‎– Au Jardin Botanique

SPH ‎– SPH019
Cassette, C46


A1 Le Tissu
A2 Au Bord De L'eau
A3 Paysage 1 Bis
A4 Sous Les Peupliers
A5 Salle Des Fêtes
A6 Mon Coeur Amoureux
A7 C'est Du Cinéma
A8 Elsa
A9 Les Fleurs Fanées
A10 Les Nuttins Dans Les Maisons
A11 Dimanche, La Ville
B1 La Colline
B2 After Removal
B3 Écorché
B4 Escapade
B5 S'en Va
B6 La Fenêtre
B7 Klimperei Très En Vacances
B8 Tout Seul Sur La Plage En Hiver
B9 Ravines
B10 Noir Ou Jaune
B11 Fille De Banlieue
B12 Les Joyeux Ouvriers

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May 28, 2012
This also comes in a neat little plastic envelope - a neat 23 tracks worth of music.
"Le Tissu" is an odd thing, threatening collapse with it's ephemeral construction - booming out backing synth, flat piano, other instruments. "Au Bord De L'eau" is a non-beat thing of harmonica, piano, acoustic guitar which somehow manages to hold itself together. "Paysage 1 Bis" is piano played by a madman - and somehow it works, an audio equivalent of the stroboscope. "Sous Les Peupliers" is a fully constructed piece which might sound well on the soundtrack of a 'romantic' film. "Salle Des Fêtes" is a sort of Tango of harmonica, guitar and piano. "Mon Coeur Amourex" is a quiet thing although it sounds more than slightly off-kilter with piano in slow cascade and harmonica grating through. "C'est Du Cinéma" is another thing only just hanging onto its construction by its fingertips. There are voices (presumably from a film soundtrack) credited to G.CARDON, breaking through the slow and reflective structure. "Elsa" is full of pomp, like something by KURT WEILL. "Le Fleurs Fanées" is a delicate little thing suggestive of rainy weather, although there is a slightly menacing undercurrent. "Les Nuttins Dans Les Maisons" is a familiar little thing which has (arr. from trad.) after the title - if you don't know it by name, then you'll probably recognize it anyway. Side one closes with "Dimanche, La Ville", a brief piano heavy tune verging on collapse.

Side two starts off with another 'trad. arr.' piece called "La Coline", which is a sort of off-key version of the "Last Post", and its also surprisingly atmospheric. "After Removal" comes next on wooden block rhythm and skeletal piano/glockenspiel to form an almost mechanical piece. "Écorché" is a complex piece of Neo Classical music - high speed playing. "Escapade" is another piano heavy composition with slightly off-key playing and strange synth sounds (for those who live in the UK, it sounds a little like something LES DAWSON might play). "S'en Va" is a slow, dramatic and atmospheric piece, reminding me a little of those filler tracks on THE CURE's "17 Seconds". "La Fenêtre" is another piece which gains it's own strange atmosphere by being solo. "Klimperei Trés En Vacances" is a full and 'up' sounding piece of music, almost joyful and Summery, as is "Tout Seul Sur La Plage En Hiver", although the latter survives without the up tempo 'whole' sound of the former. "Ravines" moves almost painfully through the speakers, a full sound around a surreal structure. "Noir Ou Jaune" is next, an almost caliope sound, melting into other structures as it grew and changes. "Fille De Banlieue" is apparently taken from "LOS PARANOS" whatever that may be! Its another of their 'up' pieces, yet retains an odd atmosphere sounding again like JAPAN. The final track is "Les Joyeux Ouvriers", a short, almost Oom Pah Pah sound.

They are clearly talented composers / musicians taking chances by leaning out further across the void than most would dare. While its not really my taste in music, you might well enjoy the album - its recorded well, as are most albums on the SPH label. SPH are clearly putting out some classic material.

Originally reviewed for Soft Watch.


September 22, 2010
Le Fleurs Lancees = les fleurs fanées ?