Kostnice ‎– Finsterfelden

Label:
Reue Um Reue ‎– RUR002
Format:
Vinyl, LP, Album, Limited Edition, Numbered
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Tracklist

A1 Forensic I 3:30
A2 Rauhreif 3:49
A3 Remember 6:19
A4 Bitter Love 4:17
A5 Asmo's Song 0:59
B1 Finsterfelden 3:45
B2 Liedchen 2:22
B3 Le Degré Zéro 4:34
B4 Die Sommer Danach 4:47
B5 Forensic II 4:05

Companies, etc.

Notes

Limited to 270 handnumbered copies in gatefold sleeve with 5 cards/inserts.

Barcode and Other Identifiers

  • Matrix / Runout (Runout side A): 63158E1/A
  • Matrix / Runout (Runout side B): 63158E2/A

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enfantterrible

enfantterrible

May 4, 2018
edited 8 months ago

The search for spirituality is almost always anchored in flames. Despair motivates the quest for that indefinable something, that intake of pure air into the woods, metaphorically speaking.

Contrarywise modern popular music attest this quests most if not all the time, but since materialism had practically eroded any trace of "spirituality" behind a mantle of empty gestures or u-turn quests, the meaningless of music too had become a testimony of the void in which society at large resides.

The inarticulation and the lack of harmony as much as the repetition and the absense from melody is to some extent the probe that music shows the same symptoms from what our culture now lives in. Emptiness. Pure existential horror disguised with the tones of a fatigued prefabricated "happiness" .
In that sense, industrial music is not a symptom but some kind of medicine or perhaps an exploration of the disease.

Modern music shows characteristics from industrialism, repetition, minimal melody, robotic pathos, devoid from harmonics or else, even content. By definition it is frivolous and superficial, this is happening since at least the apparition from disco music. And this phenomena just had exponentially increased. Our music is lacking harmony and this shows a lot on what is going on actually with society and culture at large.

Sometimes it is better to listen certain albums when time has passed after their initial release, it allows you to perceive things that bypass the cultural trend. This happened with "Kostnice". It is some sort of homeopathy, for the author I presume but, at the same time for you as a listener.
It makes you feel uneasy, disturbed even if the music per se it is not that complex or even obfuscating.
There is something on the krautrock vs drone vs post industrial structure of the music that makes you feel that something is not quite right. Opening "Forensic I" almost makes it clear with the chosen title and the atonal inconex meander of kraut rhythms and foggy drones. Soul sickness depicted perfectly as an aural painting.

The atmosphere left by this introduction, never leaves the album, and as it progress and the kraut influence becomes just a distant discordant then the industrialism takes prominence and brings another form of illness, the repetitive sequences only barely permeated by lifting drones even if appease the uneasiness still inflict some despair in the listener.

There are moments when there is the promise of peace in the meditative circunspection from the drones in "Raureif" and later in "Remenber" but there's no harmony and as result the despair filters through and traps the listener.

"Bitter love" amplifies this sentiment among its plethora of uneasy samplers and orbiting drones. Only there is bare relief from this in "Asmos song", another interesting drone meander that nevertheless never leaves the listener out of the existential misery prefigured in here.

"Finsterfelden" is maybe the most Tranquil and hopefully Spiritually aspiring piece in the album, meditative once again, but disrupted by the uneasy pathos from industrial rhythms taken from strange sequences.

There is hope in here, but in such tiny amounts that make everything look like the splash from an ant in the ocean. And as this is the peak of the album then the descent should be anticipated, kraut drone and post industrial magma until it reach the finale with the anticipated "Forensic II".
Memory is torture as much as conscience.

Interestingly the album comes with some beautiful postcards that exemplify the peace one may find in pure nature, which is kind of a brutal contrast if put into the context from the album.
This peace is partially here but only far away, as a promise amidst despair and confusion.

Intense album, somehow mysterious and evidently a self therapy for the distress of an existence trying to hold ground.