Lost ‎– Techno Funk

Label:
Perfecto ‎– PT 44560
Format:
Vinyl, 12"
Country:
Released:
Genre:
Style:

Tracklist

A Techno Funk (Part 1)
B Techno Funk (Part 2)

Credits

Notes

Rap sample from
Call It Techno
with kind permission from Breakin' Bones Records.
Special thanks to Frankie Bones

Both tracks sample:
Piano from Quadrophonia - Quadrophonia
Vocal from Frankie Bones - Call It Techno

Other Versions (1 of 1) View All

Cat# Artist Title (Format) Label Cat# Country Year
PT 44560DJ Lost Techno Funk(12", Promo) Perfecto PT 44560DJ UK 1991 Sell This Version

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Reviews Show All 3 Reviews

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Kali0x

Kali0x

September 23, 2016

I scored a copy of this record last year and remember hearing it in mixes back in the day when it came out. I never knew who it was until recently. Upon closer listening, the track reminds me a lot of Maurice* - This Is Acid (A New Dance Craze) and includes a reference to a jamming club song from Miami; Anquette - Ghetto Style, namely the track Shake It (Do The 61st) - "hold up, wait a minute..." I wonder if the resemblance to Maurice's jamming acid track has ever been made. Nonetheless, this is a bumping techno jam overall.
djkieran

djkieran

June 30, 2015
Still one of the best records ever made. The sheer intensity and excitement just oozes from this slab of techno-funk.
Sounds as fresh today as it did then . . amazing production, and Frankie Bones' extraordinary vocal makes this simply incendiary, and makes the chin stroking music that came later seem so pale in comparison. This is pure excitement on vinyl,
when people were still unafraid to have fun - this is dance music in the punk ethos. Raw energy and adrenaline. Bravo!
ultrasound

ultrasound

June 22, 2006
edited over 11 years ago

The 'Lost' project can seem ironically peculiar in view of Steve Bicknell's later, more evolved activities with the UK's underground and deliberately purist landmark techno movement. The fact that this is now a dated and somewhat embarrassing record with hints of UK hardcore and not particularly special hip-house, to me are actually reflexively positive, in that despite this, Lost the itinerant and nomadic nightclub, is still the heart of UK techno and has had a global and probably historically notable influence on that genre and therefore on 'electronic music' in general.