Merzbow, Kapotte Muziek ‎– Continuum

Label:
Cheeses International ‎– CI03
Format:
Vinyl, LP, Album, Limited Edition
Country:
Released:
Genre:
Style:

Tracklist

A Continuum 1 18:52
B Continuum 2 22:14

Companies, etc.

Credits

Notes

This work uses as source-material, recordings made of a Merzbow concert at Diogenes (Nijmegen, Netherlands) on October 3rd 1989. From these recordings a process was started in which Kapotte Muziek and Merzbow transformed the original material by various means (like repetition, electronic manipulation). Each new transformation was sent to the other, to be reworked again, but only that specific transformation. In the final mix (first mix by Kapotte Muziek, second mix (this record) by Merzbow) all previous steps could be used. Digital recording of the live concert was made by Peter Duimelinks.

Final mix by Masami Akita in December, 1991 at ZSF PRODUKT studio, Tokyo.

Limited edition of 1000 copies.
Most copies include a small size insert with notes, credits and various addresses.

Barcode and Other Identifiers

  • Matrix / Runout: 010 - 3 — A1
  • Matrix / Runout: 010 - 3 — B1

Recommendations

Reviews Show All 2 Reviews

Add Review

bonnicon

bonnicon

June 2, 2012
Weeellll, I guess you'd be surprised if I were to say this is an album of delicate, pretty ambient guitar music, wouldn't you? So rather than lie to you I'll say this is a work of harsh noise electronics, as you might have guessed. The original sounds were taken from MERZBOW live work, them gradually both MERZBOW and KAPOTTE MUZIEK would take it in turn to process and reprocess the sound, sending it back and forth between Japan and the Netherlands, until they decided it had reached a point of conclusion, with MASAMI AKITA mixing the final result.

Strangely enough, there is a certain subtlety to this music. So, maybe it does represent the war to end all wars, but there are moments of ceasefire, and a wide variety of weapons used. Often this seems like the destruction of factories by the very machines they house; sometimes it even forms primitive rhythms.

The second side utilises MERZBOW's noise to form skeletal semi-rhythmic structures with sudden changes of direction, yet, given the raw material, are clearly connected and part of one complete piece. Unlike much of MERZBOW's solo work, there's an aggitated tendency to form structures here, rather than being a wholy cacophonous noise affair.

Out and out grizzle blends with a metamorphic tendency to experiment. Rather than making a boom-and-shrill work which alienates all but the dedicated Jap Noise fan, it makes for a fascinating journey through strange sonic landscapes. An entertaining album for when you just feel like blotting out the world and losing yourself in insanity. Like so much of MERZBOW's work, there are times when the sound engulfs you like an amoeba, and it can be an interesting experience, even warming in an amyl nitrate kinda way.

Originally reviewed for Soft Watch.
consort

consort

October 1, 2009

This really is one of my favorite records ever. The detail of texture that these two have combed up is extraordinary and seems almost absurd. Totally palpable swells, contortions, spacial narratives. The listener can sink fingers, teeth, bones into it as a three- (or four-) dimensional experience.

Highly recommended. Grab a copy if you can and don't forget the subwoofers ... turn it up, loud. Over a proper system you could even call it dark techno or something, lol. In fact the way the tracks are sequenced, it's totally possible to beatmatch the tracks and let them spin next to beats (if I remember correctly, side A is around 150 BPM and side B is around 165 or so).