Mike Ness ‎– Under The Influences

Label:
Time Bomb Recordings ‎– 70930-43536-1
Format:
Vinyl, LP, Album
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Credits

Notes

℗&© 1999 Time Bomb Recordings
Printed, manufactured & distributed by Arbert Records, Inc., a unit of BMG Entertainment
Recorded at Ocean Studios
Mixed at Bay 7
Mastered at Oasis Mastering

Thanks to these artists and many more, who have not only influenced my songwriting, but my life in general.

A counterfeit version exists.

Barcode and Other Identifiers

  • Barcode: 7 0930-43536-1 3
  • Matrix / Runout (Side A, etched): OASIS DISC MASTERING 70930-43536-1A DC BQS
  • Matrix / Runout (Side B, etched): OASIS DISC MASTERING #70930-43536-1B DC BQS

Other Versions (5 of 10) View All

Cat# Artist Title (Format) Label Cat# Country Year
43536-1 Mike Ness Under The Influences(LP, Album, RE, Unofficial) Time Bomb Recordings (2) 43536-1 Europe Unknown Sell This Version
70930-43536-2 Mike Ness Under The Influences(CD, Album) Time Bomb Recordings 70930-43536-2 US Unknown Sell This Version
BVCP-21117 Mike Ness Under The Influences(CD, Album) Time Bomb Recordings, BMG BVCP-21117 Japan 2000 Sell This Version
CR00075 Mike Ness Under The Influences(LP, Album, RE) Craft Recordings CR00075 US 2018 Sell This Version
70930-43536-4 Mike Ness Under The Influences(Cass, Album, Dol) Time Bomb Recordings 70930-43536-4 US 1999 Sell This Version

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_CHAIRMANoftheBORED_

_CHAIRMANoftheBORED_

June 24, 2013
edited over 5 years ago

Well, I'm not into cover songs that much, but I guess it depends on how it's been done and maybe what has been the artist's intention. in my opinion there are artists who just cover music to cash in with a previous hit and there are artists who's intention is to disclose their influences to their audience and give something back to their idols. Mike Ness seems to be one of latter guys. Why not show the world what music touches and inspires you? A praiseworthy approach...

As I have been a huge fan of Social Distortion, rockabilly and some sort of country music, not the Nashville bullshit of course, I'll try to tell you some more about the original songs and how I see them:

1. Refers to a quite early rockabilly song from 1956 by Wayne Walker. Can't say a lot about him, except he has had a few singles in the rockabilly era and this is probably his best known hit song. Some people say that Rockabilly was the death of the original Honky Tonk music, which itself emerged in the 1930s with the end of the prohibition. At a time when black music still was labeled as "race music" the "rhythm and blues"/"rock and roll" evolved from the "jump blues music". As it reached the white youth in the 1950s country music has been put into a crisis. Most of the rockabilly artists had a country music history or at least a background. It's kinda interesting, that many singles of the mid 1950s have a rocker of one side and an emotinal song with a honky tonk appeal on the other.

2. A Rockabilly song by Marvin Rainwater originally released in 1958. This one and Baby, Don't Go are probably my favorites.

3. Another Rockabilly joint from 1956, this time by Carl Perkins, who's best known for writing the song "Blues Suede Shoes" that has been covered by former label mate Elvis Presley. The songs I'd recommend would be: Honey, Don't!, Matchbox or Pink Pedal Pushers.

4. Originally relased in 1960 by The Crickets, the backing band of the late and great Buddy Holly, who sadly died at a plane crash a year before, on the 5th of febuary 1959 with the Big Bopper and Ritchie Valens, today know as "the day the music died", Don McLean sung about in 1971. More famous versions have been released by Bobby Fuller in 1964, the Clash in 1979 and the Dead Kennedys in 1986. Don't know if it's neccessary to recommend any Buddy Holly songs, just get a "best of" and I bet you will remember most of those songs. Anyway, my picks are: "Blue Days, Black Nights" which I have once played drunk years ago at high volume in repeat and fallen asleep. My flat mates were not amused because it has played the whole night long. But whatever, they should have paid more attention in the first place, when picking their fellow lodgers. :-D Further ones would be "Well... All Right" and the "Real Wild Child", the latter performed by Jerry "Ivan" Allison, drummer of the Crickets, originally performed by the australian rockabilly artits Johnny O’Keefe and by Iggy Pop in 1986.

5. A song by Marty Robbins from 1959, a guy who has sung a lot about cowboy romantic, inspired by the singing cowboys and western swing made popular by Gene Autry and Roy Rogers. Mmmmh...

6. As far as my knowlegde goes it was originally performed by Billy Riley on Sun Records, who previously appeared as Billy Riley And Little Green Men, due to the space age spirit I guess. Better known tracks are "Red Hot" (my girl is red hot!) and "Flyin' Saucers Rock & Roll".

7. Here he is: Hank Williams, the god of Honky Tonk music! Honyk Tonk, the music of the eponymous bar rooms you probably know best from trashy movies that serve the cliché with a band protected by a wire mesh. A lot has been said about him and he has inspired the best: Johnny Cash, Buck Owens, Gram Parsons, the Beatles, just to name a few. His biography reads like guidance how to become a mistunderstood genius: A tough childhood, a troubled married life and a sudden but not surprising death. He was known as an alcoholic, became more amore unreliable and has finally dismissed by the "Grand Ole Opry". He died of a morphin-alcohol overdose at the 31th december 1951. Again, hard to pick favorites beyond the classics, but probably check out "I'll Never Get Out Of This World Alive" or a late demo "The Angel Of Death". A few black and white videos exist at youtube. Check them out!

8. Written by the legendary Harlan Howard, a songwriter who has written for the best. E.g. Buck Owens has devoted a complete album to him. The original prefformer was Jean Shepard to my knowledge, a female country artist. Check out her songs: "Second Fiddle (To An Old Guitar)" and "Franklin County Moonshine" which is about a moonshiner, producing illegal licor.

9. The first single of Nashville Star Connie Smith from 1964, wich I can't say much about, except it's a beauty.

10. A better know song of Wanda Jackson from 1961. You may know her from her Rock and Roll compilations. A Good example of a country singer, who jumped on the Rockabilly bandwagon in the 1950s. Most famous for the better known cover of the Elvis Presley song "Let's Have A Party". Yes indeed, Elvis that dirty old snatcher seems to be the original perfomer this time! Exciting! :-D My recommendations are: "Silver Threads And Golden Needles" and "I Gotta Know". Btw. there's a nice video of "I Gotta Know" recorded at the Ranch Party in 1958 at youtoube.

11. Hank Willaims again. R.I.P.!

12. Very early country classic by the Carter Family, the family June Carter, the wive of Johnny Cash, descents from. They started playing traditional country music in 1927 and have had several incarnations over the years. "Ring Of Fire" has been written for and originally performed by Anita Carter. Mother Maybelle Carter is said to have invented a special guitar style by picking the melodie and playing chords almost at the same time. As you can imagine the old songs have been recorded in a bad quality, but they're still worth hearing. "Wildwood Flower" and "Keep On The Sunny Side" are standards now, as well as "Bury Me Under The Weeping Will".

13. A country version of a Social Distortion song. Guess you know their stuff anyway, if you know about this record. I love their stuff. Especially the later records from Epic to Time Bomb Records. Their last record is dope as well, except for the cheesy California Hustle And Flow, which I really don't like and the cheap music video. IMO you need to get the vinyl version! The bonus tracks are among the best.

(written drunk over night, corrections will follow!)