Moby Grape ‎– 20 Granite Creek

Label:
Reprise Records ‎– REP 44 152, Reprise Records ‎– RS 6460
Format:
Vinyl, LP, Album
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  • Rights Society: GEMA

Other Versions (5 of 16) View All

Cat# Artist Title (Format) Label Cat# Country Year
RS 6460 Moby Grape 20 Granite Creek(LP, Album) Reprise Records RS 6460 US 1971 Sell This Version
RST 6460 B Moby Grape 20 Granite Creek(Reel, 4tr Stereo, 7" Reel, Album) Reprise Records RST 6460 B US 1971 Sell This Version
RS 6460 Moby Grape 20 Granite Creek(LP, Album, Promo) Reprise Records RS 6460 US 1971 Sell This Version
K 44152, RS 6460 Moby Grape 20 Granite Creek(LP, Album) Reprise Records, Reprise Records K 44152, RS 6460 US 1971 Sell This Version
ED 176 Moby Grape 20 Granite Creek(LP, Album, RE) Edsel Records ED 176 UK 1986 Sell This Version

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bscrawler

bscrawler

May 1, 2015
I wrote about a year or so ago inquiring about the scarcity of a reprise two-tone orange/brown label copy of 'Then play On' by Fleetwood Mac I had found that contained 'Oh Well' instead of the usual 2 Danny Kirwan tracks,'My Dream' & 'When You Say'. In a similar instance of this, I have now acquired a two-tone orange/brown reprise label pressing of this Moby Grape 1971 reunion LP. As a huge M.G. fan,I was stoked to find what seems to me a rare variation of this LP. Was wondering if anyone else out there has seen this version? Appreciate any insight/info.
crawdaddy_simon

crawdaddy_simon

March 20, 2015
A fine set of rockin’ tunes by these San Fran smellies like “I’m The Kind Of Man That Baby You Can Trust” (this is what laid-back Californian guitar noodling in the best sense of the term is all about), “Goin’ Down To Texas”, “Roundhouse Blues” (what a killer!), and the jerky “Wild Oats Moan” share the rent with weirder numbers frankly seeping out of the far left field like “Apocalypse”, “About Time” (especially the delicate first part), and the flatly incredible “Horse Out In The Rain”, all seamed and enlightened by new member Gordon Stevens’ varied string action on the electric viola, dobro, and mandolin. Finally, Skippy Spence’s entrancing koto plucking on his beautiful “Chinese Song”, I mean the way it contrasts with the intense, grinding rhythmic background, well it all just makes you wonder about the man some more, so dig it.