Modaji ‎– Modaji

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Versions (3)

Cat# Artist Title (Format) Label Cat# Country Year
LM CD 103 Modaji Modaji(CD, Album) Laws Of Motion LM CD 103 UK 2000 Sell This Version
TFCK-87820 Modaji Modaji(CD) Toy's Factory TFCK-87820 Japan 2000 Sell This Version
LMLP103 Modaji Modaji(2x12", Album) Laws Of Motion LMLP103 UK 2001 Sell This Version

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MikeMcGantic

MikeMcGantic

September 11, 2011
referencing Modaji, 2x12", Album, LMLP103

Great album that was quite popular here in Japan.
It went along well with the bossa/nujazz/lo-fi thing that was
going on around clubs here at that time.
Modaji got a lot of play from DJs like Kyoto Jazz Massive and
Shinichi Osawa and I'm sure lots of fans are wondering what happened
to Mr. Jacobson and his unique sound.
fisto1582

fisto1582

October 12, 2007
referencing Modaji, CD, TFCK-87820
My first encounter with Modaji was in 2002, when I bought a compilation that had 'Sanctuary' as Track 2. It was quite refreshing to hear that jazz and house aren't that far apart. The beauty of the song, for me, is in the arrangement. It's like he knew what each note will trigger in the listener, if it's placed there! The bass, the keys and those strings, man! This man knows how to make music!! I just wish there'd be more of his music available in hard copy in ZA!
SoulDancer

SoulDancer

November 17, 2005
edited over 13 years ago
referencing Modaji, CD, Album, LM CD 103
I discovered this release trough the track Shocka's Joint. Modaji created here a very subtle cover of Ce Ce Rogers' Brothers & Sisters, probably impressed by the remix work of our master Kerri Chandler, a track which happens to be one of my all-time classics. Shocka's Joint is far from the original in terms of style but according to my perception of both tracks, I think that Modaji catched the essence of its glorious inspiration.
scoundrel

scoundrel

March 23, 2005
edited over 13 years ago
referencing Modaji, CD, TFCK-87820

Modaji leaves behind a long line of superb broken beat releases for their self-titled debut album, where they embrace a more R&B vibe. Though it might seem like a shock to those expecting more killer future jazz, fear not, the same careful attention to rhythm and craft are plainly evident. More than anything, the addition of vocals helps give the tracks focus so that they come across as actual songs. The romantic and sensual “Shook Up” is a slow burning groove; “Rush” slinks along in a similar vein. The tempos vary as well, so the house heads can shake to “Into Something” while the head-nodding jazz enthusiasts can turn to “Outside from the Inside,” “Sanctuary,” or “Shocka’s Joint” for their fix. Just the thing you need for putting your feet up after a long day.