Monophonics ‎– Into The Infrasounds

Label:
Ageless Records ‎– 884501403122
Format:
CD, Album
Country:
Released:
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Tracklist Hide Credits

1 Goliath
Trombone – Charlie Wilson (9)
5:03
2 $2.50 3:14
3 Simon's Song
Trombone – Charlie Wilson (9)
4:57
4 I'm Done
Trombone – Charlie Wilson (9)Vocals – Marcus Scott (4)
5:11
5 Ageless (Feat. Karl Denson)
Saxophone, Flute – Karl Denson
6:23
6 Low Blow 4:12
7 Grappa
Trombone – Mic Gillette
4:56
8 Agamemnon
Trombone – Charlie Wilson (9)
4:22
9 Filth Flarn Filth (Feat. Karl Denson)
Saxophone, Flute – Karl Denson
7:29
10 Can't Leave It Alone
Harmonica – Jonathan KortyVocals – Marcus Scott (4)
4:44
11 Rotten Ribs
Trombone – Mic Gillette
3:40
12 Loose Nukes (Feat. Karl Denson)
Saxophone, Flute – Karl Denson
3:42
13 Nunu
Trumpet – Hugh Schick
4:04

Companies, etc.

Credits

Notes

All songs (c) 2010 Definitive Fidelity (SESAC).

Recorded and Mixed at The Plant Studios, Sausalito, CA

Mastered at Masterdisk

Management: Jim Moeller for Soulever Music (www.soulevermusic.com)

Barcode and Other Identifiers

  • Rights Society: SESAC

Reviews

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streetmouse

streetmouse

November 2, 2015

On Into The Infrasounds Monophonics deliver a no holds bared, up tempo horn driven infusion laced with a unabashedly solid and shameless groove laden bass-line that does not so much conjure those ultra groovy mixes of the 70’s, but manages to make them sound like you’re hearing funk for the first time ... and for those much younger than I, this may well be your introduction. Yes, you’re gonna hear the ghosts of Stax Records, along with James Brown, and of course Curtis Mayfied, but you’re also gonna hear the likes of Buddy Miles. And I tell you true, none of those cats from yesteryear are standing there feeling ripped off, with their most obvious trappings being overworked and repackaged. Into the Infrasounds is not music for porno, this is the real deal ... it’s hot and measured with a swirling tight rhythm section.

Sadly for this reviewer, what keeps this album from getting five stars is that they lack a solid strong soloist, an inspiration that would push these numbers though the roof. You won’t hear this on your first listen, your first listen will rock you back with a mile wide smile ... but it’s those subsequent plays will bring this notion into focus, and I’m more than sure that on the strength of this outing, the band has no where to go, other than to push themselves, redefine the strength of a strong solo section, or perhaps two, reinventing themselves as a seminal point, not for retro funk, but as the real deal, upending a sound that’s laid languishing for far to long.

Review by Jenell Kesler