Moongazing Hare ‎– The Sunderland Valves

Label:
Tarkovsky Green ‎– TG 004
Format:
CD, Album
Country:
Released:
Genre:
Style:

Tracklist Hide Credits

1 Oystercatcher 4:32
2 Glenmoor Rd. Garden 4:36
3 Buzzard Shade 5:22
4 The Sunderland Wife
Mixed By – Philipp Bückle
6:22
5 Raise The Sunderland Wreck 12:05
6 Gone Is The Colour 1:43
7 King Neutral's Rant
Overtone Voice – Adam Casey
5:37
8 Still No Words 3:49
9 Sleep On The Tide 3:39

Credits

Notes

Limited to 100 copies.

Barcode and Other Identifiers

  • Barcode: 708527100028

Reviews

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paddyosolivan

paddyosolivan

March 15, 2013
edited over 4 years ago

Via HeathenHarvest.org

"A moongazing hare is sitting on its back paws, looking to the sky and the moon. As a symbol, this creature is connected to Spring, as well as the shifting lunar phases, bringing new beginnings and a more fertile future. It is as thus connected to change, which may come from harsh beginnings and bitter ends. Such is the journey Moongazing Hare leads us into on Sunderland Valves, a creation springing from the departure from both a loved place and a marriage. Musician and artist David Folkman Drost is the man behind it, blending instruments, elements and vocals into something called psych-noise-folk-soundscapes by the label. To me it comes across as an obvious talent for folk inspired singer-songwriting meeting a love for sampling and mixing sounds, together building something hard to grasp, yet beautiful.

Shortly described, The Sunderland Valves is a combination of drone landscapes, mixed with numerous samples and guitar. Among this, a couple of more traditional songs find their way through, “The Sunderland Wife” being the most catchy of them, with a melody that sticks on the inside of closed eyelids like truth when one is hiding from it. The overall soundscape is somewhat calm, but at the same time carries something eerie and desperate, shown also in parts of the lyrics, such as; “…there is nowhere I can go to leave you behind, there is nowhere I can stay to keep you with me…” from “Oystercatcher”. The further into the record one gets, the more ominous become the feelings streaming through the tunes. It starts to hurt inside, something very exposed and fragile tucked in between those waves of sound, sea and salt."

Written by: Navdi

For the rest of the review:

http://heathenharvest.org/2013/03/14/moongazing-hare-the-sunderland-valves/