Nine Inch Nails ‎– Pretty Hate Machine

Label:
TVT Records ‎– TVT 2610-2, TVT Records ‎– 2610-2
Series:
NIN – halo two
Format:
CD, Album
Country:
Released:
Genre:
Style:

Tracklist Hide Credits

1 Head Like A Hole
Engineer – Doug De Angelis*Producer [Additional Remix Production] – Keith LeBlancProducer, Engineer – Flood
4:59
2 Terrible Lie
Engineer – Doug De Angelis*Producer, Engineer – Flood
4:38
3 Down In It
Engineer – Trent ReznorProducer – Keith LeBlancProducer, Engineer, Mixed By – Adrian Sherwood
3:46
4 Sanctified
Guitar [Drone Guitar At The End] – Richard Patrick
5:48
5 Something I Can Never Have 5:54
6 Kinda I Want To 4:33
7 Sin
Remix – Keith LeBlanc
4:06
8 That's What I Get 4:30
9 The Only Time
Producer – Keith LeBlanc
4:47
10 Ringfinger 5:40

Companies, etc.

Credits

Notes

This version doesn't have a printed in Canada stamp by the UPC code.

Catalog number on disc: TVT 2610
Catalog number on spine: 2610-2
Catalog number in matrix: TVT 2610-2

Halo Two

Mastered at Masterdisk, NYC
Studios: The Right Track (Cleveland), Blackwing (London), Unique (New York), Synchro Sound (Boston), Roundhouse (London)

All songs © 1989 TVT Music, Inc.

Barcode and Other Identifiers

  • Barcode: 1658-12610-2
  • Barcode (Scanned): 016581261020
  • Matrix / Runout (Variant 1): 4R TVT 2610-2 SRC=02 M6S10
  • Matrix / Runout (Variant 2): 4R TVT 2610-2 SRC=02 M6S13
  • Matrix / Runout (Variant 3): 4R TVT 2610-2 SRC=02 M2S21
  • Matrix / Runout (Variant 4): 4R TVT 2610-2 SRC=02 M7S12
  • Matrix / Runout (Variant 5): 4R TVT 2610-2 SRC=02 M2S10
  • Matrix / Runout (Variant 6): 4R TVT 2610-2 SRC=02 M2 S16
  • SPARS Code: AAD
  • ASIN: B000000GPY

Other Versions (5 of 104) View All

Cat# Artist Title (Format) Label Cat# Country Year
TVT 2610-1, TVT 2610 Nine Inch Nails Pretty Hate Machine(LP, Album) TVT Records, TVT Records TVT 2610-1, TVT 2610 US 1989 Sell This Version
ICT 9973, 848 358-4 Nine Inch Nails Pretty Hate Machine(Cass, Album, Cle) Island Records, TVT Records ICT 9973, 848 358-4 UK 1989 Sell This Version
B0015099-02 Nine Inch Nails Pretty Hate Machine(CD, Album, RE, RM, Dig) UMe B0015099-02 US 2010 Sell This Version
AMCY-345 Nine Inch Nails Pretty Hate Machine(CD, Album, Promo) TVT Records, Interscope Records, Atlantic AMCY-345 Japan 1992 Sell This Version
UICY-91219, Nine Inch Nails Pretty Hate Machine(CD, Album, RE, SHM) Interscope Records, TVT Records, Universal International UICY-91219, Japan 2008 Sell This Version

Recommendations

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PaRRa_DoXX

PaRRa_DoXX

August 23, 2017

I'm a big Front Line Assembly & Skinny Puppy fan. I like NIN but only from "Pretty Hate Machine" to "The Perfect Drug" Versions. Is it just me but does this release (original 1989) sound way better than anything from FLA up to "Tactical Neural Implant" and even possibly "Millennium"? Again compared to SP in 1989, this sounds to me much better! Equipment? Engineering? For lack of better word, this album simply sounds more "professional".

When I first heard "PHM", I kept checking the release date to make sure that it indeed came from the 80's (albeit, very late). It sounded way ahead of its time to me. Still does, in fact. Although, truth be told, I'm neither an audiophile, recording expert nor very knowledgeable about electronic music production. Still...
realmdemagic

realmdemagic

December 31, 2007

This is easily one of Trent's best albums. In fact, this was my favorite for many years until The Fragile was released. Disregard any remarks about "80s, synth or cheese." The songs on here are great. It doesn't matter what year or what particular instrument was used when the songs were created. This is not as revolutionary as The Downward Spiral or The Fragile, but it still stands out as a fine piece of work 5/5
scoundrel

scoundrel

November 18, 2005
edited over 12 years ago

The first industrial album to hit the mainstream, Nine Inch Nails' PRETTY HATE MACHINE, keeps the dance beats going, but adds an element of teenage angst to the lyrics -- which goes a long way in explaining its popularity. Clubs in the early 90s couldn't escape "Head Like a Hole" or, to a lesser extent, "Down In It." Nonetheless, the album has a melodic appeal that matches its pain-ridden lyrics, whether the rough, down-on-my-knees scream of "Terrible Lie" or the gentle piano and anguish on "Something I Can Never Have." The danciness recurs on "Sin" and "The Only Time" makes a case for funk-industrial, but the closer, "Ringfinger," brings back the beat. Ah, the good old days.