Nitsch & Gleinser ‎– Deuxieme

Label:
Voltage Musique Records ‎– VMR 007
Format:
Vinyl, 12", 45 RPM
Country:
Released:
Genre:
Style:

Notes

The theme is taken from VMR 001 "Premier pas".

Recommendations

Reviews

Add Review

technobug00

technobug00

November 26, 2005
edited over 12 years ago

The first release on Voltage Musique was sporting the label's arrogant slogan : "Fantastique musique for fantastique people", French-induced typos included. Nevertheless, that release held La Deuxième's first incarnation and for that alone, the slogan became more true than anyone expected it to be.

Two years and five releases passed since at Voltage Musique and the moment came to unveil once again that killer track, due to popular demand. The song itself is based on a rather strange idea : take the most growly analog synth you can find, add a retro string, lay a BIG (I mean HUGE) church organ sound over it and then, while maintaining the aforementionned, drop a phat, heavy bass lead. Then, when the chorus (well, kind of an instrumental chorus) comes, a weird Commodore64-reminescent (are we hearing a sidstation here ?) sound which bombs in with an unsure tremolo. The track really reach it's peak when this particular sound is twisted hard-time by the German duo and then starts over again, just satisfying you with one of the weirdest electro releases ever. What Nitsch & Gleinser did here is a fine piece of electronic music that is sure to stay around for years to come...

That's for the B-side, which is, well, the original. Now there's the A-side, which is supposed to be a remix. But there is no organ, no Commodore64 tremolo, no silly strings and really no growling synths. However, it's still agressive, and it surely manage to get one's ass moving on a dancefloor. The track is brilliant and it's very "spanking new" in the fashion, with destroyed loops and modern acid synths screaming everywhere. You know, typical "bounce-it-or-die" stuff, but nothing short of becoming a classic. Too fashioned to please the market. We'll leave the "classic !" mention to the original. It justifies buying the release on it's own.