Norman Lowrey & Robert Carnevale ‎– ReVoicings

Label:
Deep Listening ‎– DL 14-2000 CD
Format:
CDr, Album
Country:
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Tracklist

ReVoicings 27:48
1 Norman Lowrey & Robert Carnevale Untitled 2:58
2 Norman Lowrey & Robert Carnevale Untitled 3:05
3 Norman Lowrey & Robert Carnevale Untitled 3:11
4 Norman Lowrey & Robert Carnevale Untitled 3:07
5 Norman Lowrey & Robert Carnevale Untitled 3:06
6 Norman Lowrey & Robert Carnevale Untitled 3:07
7 Norman Lowrey & Robert Carnevale Untitled 3:07
8 Norman Lowrey & Robert Carnevale Untitled 3:07
9 Norman Lowrey & Robert Carnevale Untitled 3:02
Spirit Talk: Conversations With The Singing Masks 31:46
10 Norman Lowrey Untitled 3:04
11 Norman Lowrey Untitled 3:00
12 Norman Lowrey Untitled 2:59
13 Norman Lowrey Untitled 2:59
14 Norman Lowrey Untitled 3:00
15 Norman Lowrey Untitled 2:59
16 Norman Lowrey Untitled 3:00
17 Norman Lowrey Untitled 2:59
18 Norman Lowrey Untitled 3:00
19 Norman Lowrey Untitled 3:00
20 Norman Lowrey Untitled 1:41

Credits

Notes

An exploration of the sources of language and poetry in sound, <i>Revoicings</i> is a particpatory ceremony/performance piece that was premiered at the Deep Listening Space in Kingston, NY on November 12, 1999. The event was sponsored by the Pauline Oliveros Foundation Community Café series.

<i>Revoicings</i> consists of a surrounding soundscape, spoken texts, the voices of Singing Masks, and improvised interactions by everyone present. The soundscape is made of recordings of crickets, katydids, birds, frogs and other sounds occurring in my yard in northern New Jersey and in the country near Genesco, New York, together with recordings of lines of Robert Carnevale's poetry.

I further processed the recordings of poetry using granular synthesis. There were 18 lines of poetry. Each is embedded in a 3 minute overlay of the cricket/bird/etc sound, with silences between ranging from 3 to 18 seconds, in 3 second increments. These 18 segments were put on a CD. In live performance, we play 9 of these tracks, selected randomly with the CD player in shuffle mode.

Robert improvises on 9 lines of text, altered by a pitch-shifting effects processor. I sound the voices of 6 singing masks. The audience is invited to sound the lines of poetry, selected at random from a set of cards on which they are written.

There is no attempt to make the lines of poetry intelligible. The sound is what's important. The masks function as guides into the domain of understanding non-conceptually, into perceiving the intelligence of sound itself.

<I><u>Spirit Talk</u></i> is a continuation of two prior ceremony/performance pieces (<i>riverdream through us</i> and <i>Spirit Dreams: Stories of the Singing Masks</i>) in its exploration of experiencing the intelligence and underlying spiritual essence of the non-human realm. Whereas the previous pieces approached this by way of dream, <i>Spirit Talk</i> focuses on glossolalia - the spirit language of all things. The accompanying soundscape consists of rich layering of prior works each of which contains multiple recordings of river sounds, birds, crickets, and other voices of nature.

The specific ingredients of this soundscape are:
<i>On the Line</i>, an exploration of the Line of Power from Solstice Rock, York, NY to South Hill, Canandaigua, NY (3 superimposed mask ceremonies, one at Solstice Rock, another on the Genesee River, and the third at South Hill); <i>Spirit Dream I</i>, with Pauline Oliveros playing a variety of instruments processed through delay units together with 12 Singing Masks, presented at Drew University, March 1993; <i>A Vision of the Primordial Delaware</i> (sound installation for the wall hanging by Peter Kinney presented at the National Seaport Museum, Philadelphia, June, 1995), which includes recordings from the 7 sites of the Delaware River Sounding and a performance of <i>riverdream through us</i>, with Pauline Oliveros at the Nutshell Gallery in Huntington, NY, July, 1995; birds outside my 2<sup>nd</sup> floor bedroom window, 5 am, May, 1998; woodthrush, Lindwood, NY (location of Solstice Rock), June, 1998.

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