Nova Nova ‎– La Chanson De Roland

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Cat# Artist Title (Format ) Label Cat# Country Year
F 103 CD Nova Nova La Chanson De Roland(CD, Album) F Communications F 103 CD UK & Europe 1999 Sell This Version
5413356714524 Nova Nova La Chanson De Roland(CD, Album) F Communications, So Dens 5413356714524 Spain 1999 Sell This Version
F 103 PROMOCD Nova Nova La Chanson De Roland(CD, Album, Promo) F Communications F 103 PROMOCD France 1999 Sell This Version

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japedumarie

japedumarie

April 3, 2018
referencing La Chanson De Roland, CD, Album, F 103 CD

Please press on vinyl please please love this so much
_hypnodrome_

_hypnodrome_

December 4, 2017
edited about 1 year ago
referencing La Chanson De Roland, CD, Album, F 103 CD
The name of the album is of course a play on words. They use the old famous title from the literature, but they actually think of Roland machines. ;)
Creative_Code

Creative_Code

August 12, 2014
referencing La Chanson De Roland, CD, Album, F 103 CD
Still amazing 15 years later. Off course the title of the album is linked to the "middle age" spirit, especially from France and brittany. But, if you read the credits, they thank TR,JV and Jupiter, which are Old Roland Machines. I remember a documentary about electronic music with them on french television and how much they loved these machines from Roland.
yxpers

yxpers

March 23, 2008
referencing La Chanson De Roland, CD, Album, F 103 CD

The "Chanson de Roland" has nothing to do with the company Roland!!

The title of the CD is inspired from the oldest major work known in the French literature.

The text originates from a poem from a Norman poet. The "Chanson de Roland" deals with the historical Battle of Roncesvalles (Roncevaux) in 778. Though the encounter was actually an insignificant skirmish against the Basques, the poem transforms Roncesvalles into a battle against Saracens and magnifies it to the heroic stature of Thermopylae.

Check Wikipedia for more details.

doors

doors

March 23, 2005
edited over 14 years ago
referencing La Chanson De Roland, CD, Album, F 103 CD
These guys must be quite cultured, since "La Chanson de Roland" is the most popular play from the middle age. It's interesting how they use the title of that famous play in the modern age, since "chanson" is "song" in french. So when you translate it, it's "Roland's Song". Did they meant Roland as in the company? Who know? :)