O/V/R ‎– Post-Traumatic Son

Label:
Blueprint ‎– BP030
Format:
Vinyl, 12", 33 ⅓ RPM, Clear
Country:
Released:
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Credits

Notes

Pressed at MPO Averton.
© & ℗ Blueprint Records 2010.
Published by EPM Music.

Barcode and Other Identifiers

  • Matrix / Runout (Etchings Side A): BP030 A1 MPO O/V/R
  • Matrix / Runout (Etchings Side B): BP030 B1 BP030 B¹ MPO O/V/R

Other Versions (2 of 2) View All

Cat# Artist Title (Format) Label Cat# Country Year
BP030 O/V/R Post-Traumatic Son(3xFile, MP3, 320) Blueprint BP030 UK 2010
BP030 O/V/R Post-Traumatic Son(3xFile, FLAC) Blueprint BP030 UK 2010

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Reviews Show All 3 Reviews

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1984Comrade

1984Comrade

July 23, 2011
edited over 7 years ago
O/V/R Post-Traumatic Son is a top class techno attact to the highest calibre. Not to be missed. Another milestone record will shine forever.
maroko

maroko

January 11, 2011
edited over 8 years ago
After the release of the "Interior" single in 2009, the duo of James Ruskin and Karl O'Connor is back on track with an even more adventurous three tracker, pressed on clear vinyl, in the vein of some recent(er) Downwards represses.
The A side is a seriously potent club cut, rolling at an expeditious pace, with a brutal Brobdingnagian bass line which will subjugate even the most ardent disbeliever. The abundant background hisses give it that dusty 'n' rusty warehouse feeling, as the dominant bleeping signals warn about its approaching - blasting techno ammunition anno 2010!
Descending The Left Corner is some kind of a dark, dubsteppy thumper with a thick, overblown bass line and off beat percussion, with little else going on. Pretty dark and gritty, until a lighter melody is introduced some four minutes deep. Too bad it pointlessly wanders in and out of the track, never amounting to anything more, or leading to any kind of further development, interesting direction. Not really my thing, although I can imagine people digging it. Not enough effort here to make me replay it in a more intimate setting, and it just can't compare to the energetic title track, in terms of dance floor effectiveness.
The last track is the most experimental here. A mid-tempo, broken beat techno/electro collage, aimed more towards home systems than club sessions. A dark lead sequence laid over a moderate break beat prepares the territory for a creepy melody some two minutes into the track, and from there on it really morphs into a spooky, sinister number, atypical when one keeps in mind the average Regis/Ruskin work. Challenging indeed!
While not everyone will be prepared to toss a coin for "Post traumatic son", it is very well worth checking out, as it has both producers pushing the envelope even further. Karl O'Connor keeps surprising us more and more with nonconforming releases on his Downwards imprint (such as the last Sandra Electronics and numerous appearances on the mysterious Sandwell District releases), while James Ruskin has been in top form recently, touring the world with throughout 2009/2010 (held a great performance at Zagreb last season I think), and releasing four memorable EPs on his own Blueprint label: two of which were recorded under the O/V/R moniker with Regis, while the other two with fellow producer Mark Broom.
In my opinion, "Post traumatic son" does not quite reach the heights "Erotic misery" [BP031] does (another 2010 favorite with Ruskin) involved, but those hungry of marvelous, proper techno music, should give it a try if only for the wicked adrenaline rush the title track delivers!
Mezzum

Mezzum

December 11, 2010

This is superior techno goodness.

Slaying all before it with its momentous dark underbelly of percussion.

Regis & Ruskin have created another subtle monster.

5/5