Obscurum ‎– Dom

Label:
Element Com ‎– e-com 014
Format:
Vinyl, 12"
Country:
Released:
Genre:
Style:

Tracklist

Other Versions (1 of 1) View All

Cat# Artist Title (Format) Label Cat# Country Year
e-com 014 Obscurum Dom(12", W/Lbl) Element Com e-com 014 Germany 1997 Sell This Version

Recommendations

Reviews

Add Review

maroko

maroko

January 28, 2014

This release set the standard. The enigmatic duo behind the Obscurum moniker never took a wrong step, however this one is a history survivor. Hearing this tune played by Ancient Methods in Zagreb (mid November 2012) made me reconsider - and cement - its reputation. Dom, the A side, is basically what makes (used to make) techno the great musical movement it is. It's fierce, it's naïve and most of all it is unmistakably inimitable. Fifteen years after its original release date, you hear it out, and there is no way you will confuse it with anything else.

Played and remixed by just about anyone from Ibiza to Birmingham, Dom is a track that deserves rubbing shoulders with Jeff Mills' Step To Enchantment and Surgeon's Magneze. These titles were not chosen randomly, as both of the previously mentioned tracks share some similarities with Dom: both are under four minutes in duration, both are fairly simple sound and structure wise, yet their impact and legacy within the techno scene can hardly be narrowed down to words.

As basic and primitive it may sound, this is the only record that I have ever come across, that klocks in under ten minutes, and that I consider a stone cold classic. Whether you like to lose it on a darkened dance floor or reminisce of times long time gone with a firmly clutched beer, Dom will not fail you. Four on the floor affair, with deadly stabs and hardly any room for oxygen. Well, I know the last sentence does not really qualify as a mental puzzle, but then again, why should it? Justifying the classic status is not half as easy as it seems. To fully appreciate certain things, you just have to log off your facebook account and actually get into the wild. This tune - back in its day - actually did change the way some people listened to techno. Dom, while not the obvious production prodigal son many expect, is a tune age does not have a patch on.