Opal (2) ‎– Early Recordings

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Tracklist

Empty Box Blues 4:19
She's A Diamond 2:58
My Only Friend 4:01
Empty Bottles 2:02
Grains Of Sand 5:48
Brigit On Sunday 5:13
Northern Line 4:40
Strange Delight 1:42
Fell From The Sun 4:36
Harriet Brown 3:59
Lullabye 7:09
All Souls 2:22
Hear The Wind Blow 3:01

Versions (6)

Cat# Artist Title (Format) Label Cat# Country Year
ROUGH CD128 Opal (2) Early Recordings(CD, Comp) Rough Trade ROUGH CD128 UK 1989 Sell This Version
ROUGH US 53 CD Opal (2) Early Recordings(CD, Comp) Rough Trade ROUGH US 53 CD US 1989 Sell This Version
ROUGH US 53 C Opal (2) Early Recordings(Cass, Comp) Rough Trade ROUGH US 53 C US 1989 Sell This Version
ROUGH 128, RTD 138 Opal (2) Early Recordings(LP, Comp) Rough Trade, Rough Trade Records GmbH ROUGH 128, RTD 138 UK & Europe 1989 Sell This Version
ROUGH US 053 Opal (2) Early Recordings(LP, Comp) Rough Trade ROUGH US 053 US 1989 Sell This Version
ROUGH 128, RTD 138 Opal (2) Early Recordings(LP, TP, W/Lbl) Rough Trade, Rough Trade Records GmbH ROUGH 128, RTD 138 UK 1989 Sell This Version

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giomakyo

giomakyo

January 30, 2010
referencing Early Recordings, LP, Comp, ROUGH US 053
I cannot say enough good about this album. Opal took everything that was good about the Velvet Underground, The Doors,The Stones' ballads, and Syd Barret-era Pink Floyd and poured it into one flawless gem of an album. Moody psych-folk just doesn't get any better than this. This was the first cd that got me to break with analog, and the reason was to get "Hear The Wind Blow", which is maybe the best track they ever did, but not on the vinyl record. Kendra Smith channeled "I'll Be Your Mirror"-style Nico through a filter of borderline folk and blues, while guitarist David Roback was either all keening slides and hanging glides, or mellow strumming acoustic chords. "Fell From The Sun", "Grains of Sand", and "Lullabye" are exquisite imaginings of what The Doors' raga-rock might have been like if they had smoked more weed and drank less Jack Daniels: pure hypnotic bliss. This album suffered from being released after the band broke up --and after the release of their underwhelming debut, "Happy Nightmare Baby", which was marred by poor recording, with a strangely muffled sound -- which is a shame, because this is a stunner. After Kendra lost it, Hope Sandoval stepped in, and Opal would soon become Mazzy Star, a great band in their own right, but this record remains a classic, the absolute pinnacle of the various twists and turns in the road from the early-80s "Paisley Underground". Anyone who loves The Velvets will simply want to die when they finally hear this record and realise how many years of their life they have spent without these heartbreakingly gorgeous songs to grace their ears.