Original Instrument ‎– Original Instrument

Label:
Kracfive ‎– KFAT009
Format:
CD, Album
Country:
Released:
Genre:
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Tracklist Hide Credits

1 Bop Me 2:47
2 Lum Club 3:54
3 Sion 5:43
4 Rosetta
Voice [The Lovelies] – Ari (7), Sivan (2)
4:07
5 Birds For Beginners 3:50
6 Nake 4:22
7 Conversong 5:25
8 Happy We Do 2:54
9 Heavens To Betsy 5:33
10 Coughio 3:34
11 This Brief Dream 7:15

Companies, etc.

Credits

Notes

Artist/title on cover & disc: Original Instrument.
Artist/title on spine: The Original Instrument.

Art under exclusive license from Evil Dimension / TPOLM Ltd.
Copyright Shit 2001 Kracfive Records.
Catalog # according to Kracfive website: KFAT009CD.

Issued in a jewel case with 4-page booklet including lyrics.

Barcode and Other Identifiers

  • Matrix / Runout: #57116/2

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Reviews

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mjb

mjb

January 8, 2015

Here's some embarrassing drivel I wrote about Original Instrument in December 2001:

I probably prematurely dismissed this year's other Kracfive label releases as being gratuitously "glitchy", although my ear has yet to be trained to sense all the subtleties of this fashionable genre, so I submit that any reviews I offer of this stuff be taken with a chunk of salt.

This one is really different, though, and quite clever. As its title suggests, it involves the human voice. 11 tracks of cut up, layered samples of many different voices sequenced rapid-fire and in patterns similar to glitch techno. The vocal snippets are usually tonal, but they are sometimes augmented with atonal bits like coughs or distortions that aren't even recognizable as human.

It is somewhat reminiscent of The Art Of Noise's sampling experiments on tracks like "Opus III" and selections from the "Who's Afraid" album, in that Original Instrument is as simultaneously avant-garde and pop-sensible today as Art of Noise were in the mid-80s.

On a compilation, any one of these tracks would stand out as being fairly innovative, though perhaps a bit pretentiously novel—I'd not be surprised to hear it alongside John Zorn in a dance recital—so whether an entire album of this material was warranted may be cause for disagreement.

Nevertheless, it's considerably more enjoyable, to me at least, than releases 008 and 010, and is one I'll be keeping for a while. Of particular interest is the fascinating ink artwork in the CD inserts, and the fact that the phonetic "lyrics" for the layers in every track are provided. Cute.