Panthéon* ‎– Orion

Label:
Vertigo ‎– 6360 850
Format:
Vinyl, LP, Album
Country:
Released:
Genre:
Style:

Tracklist

A1 Daybreak 2:30
A2 Anaïs 5:00
A3 Apocalyps 10:52
A4 The Madman 1:20
B Orion 19:27

Credits

Notes

Released in a fully laminated cover on a ''swirl'' Vertigo label.

Barcode and Other Identifiers

  • Rights Society: STEMRA
  • Matrix / Runout: (Stamped) P1972 AA 6360850 1Y 1 670 03112
  • Matrix / Runout: (Stamped) P1972 AA 6360850 2Y 1 670 03112

Other Versions (2 of 2) View All

Cat# Artist Title (Format) Label Cat# Country Year
CDP-1074-DD Panthéon* Orion(CD, Album, Unofficial) Pseudonym (2) CDP-1074-DD Russia Unknown Sell This Version
CDP-1074-DD Panthéon* Orion(CD, Album) Pseudonym CDP-1074-DD Netherlands 2001 Sell This Version

Reviews Show All 2 Reviews

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folkfun

folkfun

November 9, 2015

there is a bootleg Korean? cd also, as wel las digital flac download from cdbaby. no reason to pay so much for a cd!!!!!
marcelrecords

marcelrecords

September 28, 2012
edited over 6 years ago
The only Dutch signing to release an album on swirl Vertigo and an extremely rare record. This is clearly the brainchild of the otherwise unknown Ruud Wouterson, who wrote all the material. There is massive influence of Focus (2), which is underlined by some wordless vocals and prominent flute parts. The first two tracks are modestly respectable progressive rock played in pastel shades. The album really takes off with the long Apocalyps, a more inventive piece of prog-rock, although the end of times surely will be more dramatic than this friendly bit of music, we guess. The madman doesn't live up to its title at all. The side-long title track on side B is better than all that went before. The band plays more concise, sharper, and the melodies are better. Again the ghost of Focus hovers above much of the sound. This is surely a creditable album, though.

Another mirrored photograph presents the lads on the front cover with the obligatory denim plus hair. The starkness of the surroundings just about saves the image from banality. The backcover shows a superb 18th century Orion, complete with hunting dog and cudgel, all made out of tinplate and the recording information, too.
The lettering maybe a bit rigid, but functions well in its context.