Pink Floyd ‎– The Dark Side Of The Moon

Label:
Harvest ‎– SHVL 804, Harvest ‎– 1E 064 o 05249
Format:
Vinyl, LP, Album, Gatefold Sleeve
Country:
Released:
Genre:
Style:

Companies, etc.

Credits

Notes

Recorded at Abbey Road Studios, London between June 1972 and January 1973.

℗ 1973 The Gramophone Co. Ltd.
Made in Gt. Britain

E.M.I Records (The Gramophone Co. Ltd.) Hayes · Middlesex · England
File under POPULAR : Pop Groups
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This is the original form of the release, it has solid light blue prism LP picture labels with silver lettering, later forms have an empty prism. It has a gatefold sleeve, and there are three known variations of the original blue-tinged sleeve - see below. Originally delivered with 2 posters and 2 stickers.

There are 2 systems for track numbering on the release. The cover lists the titles A1 to B5 (used in this submission). The labels however number the tracks from (a) to (i) so, for example, "Breathe" is listed as "(a)(II)" on the label but "2" on the cover (see images).

The following is a guide to identifying all of the elements that make up the first pressing:

1. The label has a solid light blue prism. Subsequent pressings have a blue glowing inner edge prism with the centre black.
2. 'The Gramophone Co.' text starts at 10 o'clock on label.
3. A-2/B-2 matrix stamps appear in the runout area.
4. Thick heavyweight vinyl believed by some to be the 'finest' and most true encapsulation of this historical recording as the first pressing was pressed direct from the original masterplate.
5. There is a distinct bluish tint/tinge in the black ink of the cover.
6. There are three known original sleeve variations. 1. The right front opening of the gatefold cover is sealed with the two sides glued together. 2. The right front opening of the gatefold cover is sealed with a fold over flap that is glued inside the opening. 3. The right front opening of the gatefold cover is not sealed. A known 2/2 matrix, 1 mother, G stamper copy came with (3), an unglued and non-'folded in' sleeve at time of release, which hints at the possibility that very first pressings did not come with glued flaps, which is where the poster and stickers were located.
7. Inner sleeve is a distinctive polythene lined die cut black semi matt paper with white printed text stating 2 patent numbers bottom left [1125555/1072844] and 'MADE IN GREAT BRITAIN' bottom right.
8. Posters and stickers were printed on paper stock that has a rough texture (later pressings used paper that was gloss laminated).
9. Stickers have printed backs with diagonal lines across them, and the words 'Fasson' 'FasPrint' and 'Crack-Back'.
10. Some copies came with a small round sticker white text on blueish black stating 'Pink Floyd The Dark Side of the Moon' (confirmed for stampers GL/MO), while some others do not.
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This first edition was initially pressed by The Gramophone Co. Ltd., from July 1st, 1973 by its legal successor, EMI Records Ltd. at the same plant.
International E.M.I. catalog number 1E 064 o 05249 appears in small fonts and parentheses on the cover rear.

Note on Credits:
Though credited for the entire album, Barry St John, Doris Troy, Lesley Duncan, and Liza Strike perform backing vocals only on tracks A4, B2, B4, and B5.

Barcode and Other Identifiers

  • Matrix / Runout (Label A): SHVL 804A
  • Matrix / Runout (Label B): SHVL 804B
  • Other (Printer date/format code, gatefold inner): Ⓛ 7303 TPS
  • Other (Patent No.s on inner sleeve): 1125555 1072844
  • Matrix / Runout (Runout A, stamped variant 1): SHVL 804 A-2 G 1
  • Matrix / Runout (Runout B, stamped variant 1): SHVL 804 B-2 G 1
  • Matrix / Runout (Runout A, stamped variant 2): SHVL 804 A-2 ML 2
  • Matrix / Runout (Runout B, stamped variant 2): SHVL 804 B-2 RG 2

Other Versions (5 of 813) View All

Cat# Artist Title (Format) Label Cat# Country Year
1C 064-05 249 Pink Floyd The Dark Side Of The Moon(LP, Album, RE, Gat) Harvest, EMI Electrola 1C 064-05 249 Germany 1976 Sell This Version
7243 582136 2 1 Pink Floyd The Dark Side Of The Moon(SACD, Hybrid, Multichannel, Album, RE, RM, Son) Parlophone 7243 582136 2 1 Europe Unknown Sell This Version
TOCP-71163•64 Pink Floyd The Dark Side Of The Moon(CD, Album, RE, RM + CD, Album + Sli) EMI TOCP-71163•64 Japan 2011 Sell This Version
UDCD 517 Pink Floyd Dark Side Of The Moon(CD, Album, RE, RM) Mobile Fidelity Sound Lab UDCD 517 Japan 1988 Sell This Version
8E 064-05 249, SHVL 804, 11C 0765249 Pink Floyd The Dark Side Of The Moon(LP, Album, RE, Gat) Harvest, Harvest, Harvest 8E 064-05 249, SHVL 804, 11C 0765249 Portugal 1983 Sell This Version

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leonthepro

leonthepro

January 20, 2019
Release reviewed here: https://www.discogs.com/Pink-Floyd-The-Dark-Side-Of-The-Moon/release/4655423
As my journey continues in search of the best Dark Side of the Moon I finally stumble upon an early UK copy in good condition and decide to buy it. To be specific a third generation A3/B3 from 1973.
Mostly I went back and forth with my 2016 reissue on the tracks Money and Time because I felt like I needed to narrow it down to shorter switching times and still need tracks that have lots of different qualities to them, when it comes to Dark Side, most releases are well mastered in general so comparing becomes a tightrope where the devil lies in the details.
I described the 2016 Grundman cut as a very balanced and only slightly harsh but well sounding alternative. Which is what we come to realize again here. The UK does seem slightly less edgy in comparison and from experience with comparing other Pink Floyd originals vs reissue this is a common trend, the EQ is a smidge lower, removing some of that harshness. Cymbals and high hats sound more smooth and earthy while the reissues is more metallic for example.
Its not to say that it doesnt use the high end to effect though, the guitars have just as much clarity and air if not more even, on the original. It then gives the lower end some more ground to stand on simultaneously.
Reverb too seems just as good if not better here on the A3/B3 giving subtitles in echoes more effect.
The plus for the 2016 cut then is present in certain areas where its EQ has better effect, such as the clocks on Time. This can be extended to more areas as a general rule where the original is not as in the room and realistic.
But right after we are then treated to the synth and drum intro before the vocals and the UK certainly has more bite here. That coupled with the extra bass from the low end really gives it and edge over the reissue.
And thats where I stop at least for now as I decided the UK to be the winner.
One of the main drawbacks for the reissue really was that slight harshness I felt and while the higher end EQ choices have been favoring for other PF reissue such as on WYWH where I actually favor the Grundman cut over the UK original for sounding more real and less bloaty, here it mostly has the opposite effect.
There still is, for example, some sibilance on the UK. Although because my copy is used and my stylus is Elliptical I dont dare say how much it really is. But I do assume that the only way to solve that entirely is in way of the extra smooth and pleasant MFSL release. And dropping the needle on its Money track as a finisher really affirms my belief that it is the best version for that song alone at least.
In the end the UK original takes the spot over the 2016 reissue for now. Ill try to give the other releases a head to head again sometime but right now I dont want to spoil the album too much.
Find it in NM condition and you will surely be a happy listener.

Current Ranking:
1. MoFi's Side 2
2. Japanese PRO USE's Side 1
3. UK original A3/B3 (This)
4. 2016 Grundman Cut
?. MoFi UHQR

Equipment Used:
Rega RP1 with Nagaoka MP-200 Cartridge
Cyrus 2 Amplifier
System Fidelity SF-3050 Tower Speakers
Custom made HQ Speaker Cables
notsavedjr

notsavedjr

November 19, 2018
It probably should be noted that the live poster for the UK issue is different to the US counterpart, as well...aside from having different band photos in the inset pictures, it is landscape format, where the US poster is portrait format. These are not just on the first pressings, of course, but worth noting if you might be on the hunt for the correct accoutrements to your particular pressing...

jakeyyates

jakeyyates

July 30, 2018

If anyone has the pyramid poster or both stickers for this copy, please message me as I am looking complete my copy
Hiphophead1

Hiphophead1

July 24, 2018
edited 6 months ago
not my style of music but gave it a shot and its an amazing album probably one of the greatest album of any genre of all time
Kvmil

Kvmil

June 15, 2018
Can someone help me identify this version of LP? https://imgur.com/a/1cm8Emt
vinyl_with_love

vinyl_with_love

June 14, 2018

hi, i have a version of the first pressing close to NM condition, the one with the label with silver lettering on blue, and out of the three "pressings" the very first one with a foldout cover. it has been hardly played. now, there's a skip on side B. the vinyl is perfect at the piece - i inspected it with magnifier glass and nothing. so i looked up on forums about skips of the very first press and some say it's at the B side, indeed during "money", as it is with my copy. anyone knows more information about this?
rebelfloyd

rebelfloyd

March 31, 2018
My release appears to be a 1973 Capital release.

Side 1: SMAS-1-11163 - H74 #3 X(x with circle around it) ML
Side 2: SMAS-2-11163 - G-70 #5 ---<

Rainbow colour around the center ring as well. Can find H74 in the list but nothing on G-70.

Any help? Thanks.
black-shuck

black-shuck

March 11, 2018
1972 - "Dark Side of the Moon" is released by Medicine Head on John Peels Dandelion label.

1973 - Pink Floyd release "Dark Side of the Moon"...

Just imagine if Coldplay released an lp entitled "OK Computer" a year after Radiohead..

time tends to blur the importance of these small details..
aoguy

aoguy

March 3, 2018
My copy, bought the first week of release in 1973, does not have "sticker" on the cover. Otherwise it matches.
streetmouse

streetmouse

February 22, 2018

What can I possibly say about an album that not only means so much to so many, and has influenced an equal number ... other then to tell you some personal stories regarding the album, from my perspective, from someone in their early twenties when The Dark Side of the Moon slammed head long into this portion of the galaxy.

I was in Viet Nam when Dark Side was released, and please allow me to assure you, that sitting comfortably in your living room and hearing this piece of music is one thing, sitting in the middle of the jungle, on the other side of the world, on the dark side of the moon, if you will ... now that was an adventure. Viet Nam was black as coal at night, the stars shown down like brilliant beacons, shadows moved from things I couldn’t see, while things moved that didn’t cast shadows, and at times it was so quiet that the noise of the chirping bugs was deafening. This was my introduction to Dark Side of the Moon, and hearing this surreal soundscape mixed with the comings and goings of war added a fourth dimension to each and every song. There were no walls, nothing to contain the music, it just filled up my hootch, floated out through the misquote netting, and drifted off into the jungle, where I’m more than sure that today it’s still resonating from tree to tree.

Now, the coolest thing was when PsyOps got a hold of it. These guys had huge speaker systems that where attached to the choppers, and they would blast the VC with ungodly noise both day and night ... but when we nurses showed up at their hanger with Dark Side Of The Moon in hand, why it took those boys about three minutes to hook the stereo up to those huge speakers, power up the amp, and treated us to a concert style playback in surround sound, that actually shook the walls.

Dark Side of the Moon was on the Top 100 for something like a million weeks. It was the seminal album to be used when purchasing stereos, speakers and using dope. There were a certain number of albums one simply had to own, otherwise you hung your head in shame, and Dark Side was at the top of the list. Dark Side was playing all of the time, but that was back when Rolling Stone Magazine was counter culture, filled with stereo adds, mail order bongs, and those uncomfortable Earth Shoes. Just the words Dark Side and Pink Floyd were dropped to let people know that you were hip, with the poster from the first edition hung prominently in everyone’s living room.

The music from Dark Side has stood the test of time astonishingly well, though for me, not the trippy cash registers, the screaming or the bells. I have taken the album to a friend who has mixed out all of those annoying sounds, leaving me with one of the smoothest, lush and flowing albums I could ever have conjure into being. There is no way to measure all of the groups who would reference Dark Side as the seminal release that spurred them on, and it certainly must be considered as a historical release, giving the album a central place in musical history.

Everything Pink Floyd ever did lead them to the making Dark Side Of The Moon, and everything they did after was a mere reflection of it. I’m sure that one day people will wonder what all the hoopla was about, but by then I won’t care ... I’ll just shrug my shoulders knowing that The Dark Side Of The Moon effected everything I have ever done or thought.

Review by Jenell Kesler