S. Haseley* / P. Milray* ‎– Skyboat

Label:
Rouge Music Ltd. ‎– RMS/LP 101
Format:
Vinyl, LP
Country:
Released:
Genre:
Style:

Tracklist

A1 S. Haseley* Summer Vibes 3:30
A2 S. Haseley* Big Daddy 2:50
A3 P. Milray* Surfers' Paradise 3:48
A4 S. Haseley* Delta 88 2:33
A5 P. Milray* Soda Pop 5:05
A6 P. Milray* Summer Spin 2:59
B1 S. Haseley* Do It, Darling 2:16
B2 S. Haseley* Skyboat 3:17
B3 P. Milray* St. Malo 4:40
B4 P. Milray* Roadster 2:29
B5 S. Haseley* Sandcastle 2:25
B6 P. Milray* Breezin' 2:58

Notes

Subtitled: Vocal And Instrumental Pop Sounds With A Feeling Of Summer

Reviews

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disintegrati

disintegrati

September 23, 2018

When Skyboat was released in 1975, The Beach Boys were busy proclaiming that "Brian was back!" and Mike Love and his cohorts were surfing the wave of success (terrible pun sadly intended) with previous year's extremely popular "Endless Summer" compilation. The idea for Skyboat must've been born out of these things, and the result is like listening to The Beach Boys' "Stack-o-Tracks" album in a padded cell in another dimension. Most, if not all, of the music here is an attempt to emulate The Beach Boys circa 1965, which means that you won't find the more experimental sounds of "Smiley Smile" (or even "Smile") here. This is sunny and clean cut music with a fake smile. Everything is nicely arranged complete with brass, keyboards, a tiny bit of synthesiser and lots of sleigh bells.

It's quite fun trying to pin down all of the Brian Wilson cops on the LP: Parts of "Summer Vibes" is obviously based on "Good Vibrations"; "Do It, Darling" is an attempt at cloning the sound of "Wild Honey"; the title track is unashamedly lifting parts from "Sloop John B" and "Sandcastle" turns a minuscule part of "God Only Knows" into an idiotic riff while "Soda Pop" sounds like a distant, inbred cousin of Neil Sedaka's "Oh! Carol".

Some parts are actually rather good, others would drive any person insane. "Delta 88" is so annoying that I wouldn't be surprised of someone in the future leaked documents showing how this song was used on Guantanamo inmates. I'd rather stab myself in the ear with a burning metal dildo than listen to it again. Some of the wordless "ba ba ba" vocals sound truly idiotic, like a parody of The Beach Boys -- which is kind of both a blessing and a curse. It adds to the charm in some way.

My personal favourite here is probably "Breezin'", which sounds absolutely nothing like The Beach Boys. It sounds more like the ship in "Love Boat" hitting an iceberg and slowly sinking during a depressing New Year's Eve celebration in the 1920s.