Sutekh ‎– Periods.Make.Sense.

Label:
Force Inc. Music Works ‎– FIM-1-039
Format:
CD, Album
Country:
Released:
Genre:
Style:

Tracklist

1 Untitled 3:44
2 Untitled 3:29
3 Untitled 6:19
4 Untitled 4:16
5 Untitled 1:59
6 Untitled 4:17
7 Untitled 2:36
8 Untitled 7:40
9 Untitled 3:37
10 Untitled 5:29
11 Untitled 3:44

Companies, etc.

  • Distributed ByEFA – EFA 04439-2
  • Made ByMPO

Notes

Force Inc. Music Works 2000.
Sutekh appears courtesy of Context.

Made in France.

Barcode and Other Identifiers

  • Barcode: 718750443922
  • Label Code: LC 06001
  • Matrix / Runout: FIM 1039 MPO02 @@@ 4 02
  • Mastering SID Code: IFPI L033
  • Mould SID Code: IFPI 1210

Other Versions (2 of 2) View All

Recommendations

Reviews Show All 5 Reviews

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Deejie1

Deejie1

January 27, 2017

I like the album and see as ambient not minimal. I'd put it in the same genre as Namlook.
jiggawhat

jiggawhat

November 14, 2012

It's an early, simplistic form of minimal. As Resident Advisor puts the problem, "[minimal is] music that strives to be so boring 90% of the time that the other 10% of relatively mediocre drama seems thrilling by contrast". Unfortunately, this album falls under the former, with a few rare moments of excitement. The ambient parts are hardly anything to write home about, either.
mastaace

mastaace

September 16, 2011
edited over 5 years ago

a very personal album full of sexiness and melancholy, of course the beat-driven songs are easier to approach, but if one takes his time to get into the more ambient tracks, one finds lots of beauty there.... still totally up to date.
Mieli

Mieli

January 2, 2011

The subtle, papery drum sounds count an understated beat (only with a casual suggestion towards the parent 'techno' genre), while the distant, ambiance of the chordal material sits below this with a a kind of disturbing persistence. Bass material is supplied only sporadically and mostly tastefully, again only hinting towards the driving sub-bass material of harder genres.

Sutekh shows brief periods of brilliant sensitivity with his tight, warm (yet definitely digital) loops and rhythms, but the album has an inconsistency that still confuses - a decade after the release. Less than half of the album (I won't bother naming the tracks, even if I could) consist of what is described above, and the remaining tracks are a set of soundscapes. These are varied enough, but lack the interest, punch and careful composition of the beat-driven songs.

Is the album conceptual, with the handful of upbeat tracks providing crescendos or key scenes in some unwritten story-arc? Maybe, but then there is hardly enough context provided to convince any listener for a set of untitled, seemingly arbitrarily arranged tracks will need special instruction for this to be acceptable. Besides, thematic or repeated content is absent.

It must be that the album is less electronic than it is experimental, and it seems strange that this album sits aside such early click-n-cut heavyweights as Andreas Tilliander or Vladislav Delay - where rhythm, and structure are paramount and ambiance is (at best) a backdrop to these vital elements.

No, Periods.Make.Sense is a nonsensical album, and is apparently filled with unmemorable filler tracks - padding out the progressive, beat-driven EP that it should have been.