The Fire* ‎– Father's Name Is Dad / Treacle Toffee World

Label:
Decca ‎– F 12753
Format:
Vinyl, 7", 45 RPM, Single
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A Father's Name Is Dad
Written-By – Lambert*
B Treacle Toffee World
Written-By – Lambert*

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Barcode and Other Identifiers

  • Matrix / Runout (Side A Label): DR 41268
  • Matrix / Runout (Side B Label): DR 41269

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zydsstuff

zydsstuff

January 22, 2015
Found this for 50p in a charity shop - well chuffed !
RhubarbRhubarb

RhubarbRhubarb

February 16, 2009
edited over 8 years ago

Despite these tracks appearing on numerous 'psychedelic' comps over the years, neither track can really be described as psychedelic. They probably have much more in common with '66 era Who or even late 70s punk/power pop. The A side features sneering juvenile delinquent vocals over a punchy mod backing with an uber-catchy chorus over descending power chords. The B side is a in similar vein, just not as catchy.

While most of their contemporaries were mimicking Cream and Hendrix, or plodding towards a blues based sound following the post-psychedelic comedown, The Fire were honing a hard edged pop sound that their management christened 'finky funky', or something. Perhaps the fact that they were so out of step with the times explains why such a sure fire hit in any other era sold so few copies at the time, resulting in it becoming one of the most sought after and expensive UK 60s 45s.

Paul McCartney had high expectations and took so much interest in it due to Apple publishing the tunes, that when he heard the initial run of demo copies he demanded it be re-recorded with added harmony vocals and an extra guitar overdub to beef it up. Having heard both versions, he probably should have left it well alone, as the subsequent withdrawal and re-release only served to kill off very modest interest and the overall sound just became muddier.

The Fire went on to record a further totally crap 45 for Decca and a patchy LP for Pye, which sold about 3 copies.