The George Shearing Quintet And Orchestra* ‎– Black Satin

Label:
Capitol Records ‎– SM-11800
Format:
Vinyl, LP, Album, Mono, Reissue
Country:
Released:
 
Genre:
Style:

Tracklist Hide Credits

A1 The Folks Who Live On The Hill
Written-By – Jerome Kern, Oscar Hammerstein II
A2 If I Should Lose You
Written-By – Leo Robin, Ralph Rainger
A3 Starlight Souvenirs
Written-By – Lewis Ilda, Reginald Connelly, Ted Shapiro
A4 What Is There To Say
Written-By – E.Y. Harburg, Vernon Duke
A5 Black Satin
Written-By – George Shearing
B1 You Don't Know What Love Is
Written-By – Don Raye, Gene DePaul
B2 Nothing Ever Changes My Love For You
Written-By – Jack Segal, Marvin Fisher
B3 One Morning In May
Written-By – Hoagy Carmichael, Mitchell Parish
B4 Moon Song
Written-By – Arthur Johnston, Sam Coslow
Medley:
B5a As Long As I Live
Written-By – Charles Tobias, Max Steiner
B5b Let's Live Again
Written-By – George Shearing

Companies, etc.

Credits

Barcode and Other Identifiers

  • Matrix / Runout (Runout 1 etched / stamped): Sm - 1 -11800 - G 1 ERT Mastered By Capitol
  • Matrix / Runout (Runout 2 etched / stamped): Sm - 2 -11800 - G 1 ERT Mastered By Capitol

Reviews

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joy4sale

joy4sale

February 21, 2017

One may expect to hear bland easy-listening music that was typical of Shearing's 1950's LPs containing some kind of cloth (satin, lace, velvet, etc) in the title. Instead one hears the quintet's usual relaxed performance, accompanied by an orchestra that Billy May co-arranged and presumably conducted. (Always a good thing when Billy May contributes.) In addition, the hardy thick Capitol discs of yore seem to track better than the thinner successors. Some say that Capitol's monophonic recordings of the 1950s are their best-sounding ones. This one certainly sounds very natural and gives an excellent sense of the acoustic space of the studio. Listening via two speakers, one might well think they are stereophonic. In my experience, monophonic LPs also are less bothered by scuffs and needle swipes. In conclusion, his is 1950s make-out music extraordinaire - though the tactic might backfire because a musically inclined date might well be tempted to listen rather than bill and coo.