The House Of Love ‎– The House Of Love

Label:
Relativity ‎– 88561-8245-1
Format:
Vinyl, LP, Album
Country:
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Credits

Notes

Licensed for US release by Creation Records.

With Thanks
Alan McGee
Mick Griffiths

Album cover and labels do not list durations of songs

Barcode and Other Identifiers

  • Barcode (Printed): 88561-8245-1
  • Barcode (Scanned): 088561824518
  • Matrix / Runout (Side A): 88561-8245-1-A fw ¢ -EMW-
  • Matrix / Runout (Side B): 88561-8245-1-B -EMW-

Other Versions (5 of 30) View All

Cat# Artist Title (Format) Label Cat# Country Year
CRELP 34, CRELP034 The House Of Love The House Of Love(LP, Album) Creation Records, Creation Records CRELP 34, CRELP034 UK 1988 Sell This Version
GA-228K The House Of Love The House Of Love(Cass, Album) Grabaciones Accidentales GA-228K Spain 1988 Sell This Version
VDP-1404 The House Of Love The House Of Love(CD, Album) Creation Records VDP-1404 Japan 1988 Sell This Version
REN CD 23 The House Of Love The House Of Love(CD, Album, RE) Renascent REN CD 23 UK 2007 Sell This Version
CRCDBOX61 The House Of Love The House Of Love(CD, Album, RE, RM + CD, Album, RE + CD + CD, RE + ) Cherry Red CRCDBOX61 UK 2018 Sell This Version

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streetmouse

streetmouse

January 7, 2018
edited 10 months ago

Never ones to shy away from confusion, House of Love have more than one album that goes by the formal title of House of Love, and if that’s not difficult enough, this is a band who nearly broke up before they even managed to record their first album. With a fist full of singles under their belt, founding member Andrea Heukamp left the band, though surprisingly she dose show up on the stunningly haunting number “Christine,” which turned out to be the college radio hit for House of Love back in 1988.

The album on a whole, even with its engaging guitar work and inspired deliveries, remains a rather moody and self reflective album for Guy Chadwick, who penned all of the tracks, with the number “Man Child” encompassing the attitude that Chadwick just felt entirely too old at the young age of 26, while “Sulphur” was inspired by the demised of Chadwick’s first marriage, then their’s “Love In A Car” which is loosely based on an affair that went on endlessly too long, and “Road,” which defined Chadwicks sense of alienation on his move to London. Of course it didn’t help that they had but a week to pull this collection together, all while downing remarkable doses of LSD, where produce Pat Collier threw up his hands saying, “They’re stoked to the gills, hearing things that aren’t there, and injecting things into the music that have no business being there.”

That being said, House of Love have always been a rather strange band, plotting a course though more underground pop oriented jangle inspired songs. Of course while Chadwick’s material was the bedrock of the band, it was left to Terry Bickers to chart the course home of House of Love with his sonic pre-shoegazing atmospheric textures, meaning that Bickers had enough hooks and inspiration to make even a weak Chadwick song sound amazing, with the two engaged in an alchemy of playing off of each other’s personal needs, musical desires and aspirations.

Nearly relegated to being a footnote of those early years, House of Love always had a cult following, and for my money, all members in or out, they’ve not created one album that is not very rapturing and enticingly listenable, with beautiful melodies that are interwoven with chiming guitars that movingly float through the an atmosphere of intoxication. But as usual, I’ve gotten ahead of myself, because looking back on the music laid down between these grooves, these initial songs weren’t that good, or skillfully delivered, though there is not a person from those early days who did not breathe a joyous sigh of relief when the Fontana or Butterfly hit the store shelves almost two years later, with fans delighted that they’d stayed for the whole show. So while perhaps not the highlight of the year 1988, this album did open the door, and give one of the most under appreciated bands a chance to have their day in the sun, where with the planets alined, I’ve always been forever grateful.

Review by Jenell Kesler