Tinariwen ‎– Tassili

Label:
V2 ‎– VVR776938, Cooperative Music ‎– VVR776938
Format:
2 × CD, Album, Limited Edition
Country:
Released:
Genre:
Style:

Tracklist Hide Credits

Tassili #1
1-1 Imidiwan Ma Tenam
Guitar – Nels ClineRecorded By [Nels Cline Recorded By] – Andris Balins, Mark Wheaton, Tom Schick
1-2 Assuf D Alwa
Vocals – Kyp Malone
1-3 Tenere Taqhim Tossam
Guitar – Kyp MaloneLead Vocals – Eyadou Ag LecheVocals – Tunde Adebimpe*Written-By – Tunde Adebimpe*, Eyadou Ag Leche, Ibrahim Ag Alhabib, Kyp Malone
1-4 Ya Messinagh
Arranged By [Horns Arranged By] – Ian BrennanBaritone Saxophone, Soprano Saxophone – Roger Lewis (2)Horns – The Dirty Dozen Brass BandRecorded By [The Dirty Dozen Brass Band Recorded By] – Jake EckertTrumpet – Gregory Davis
1-5 Walla Illa
Guitar – Kyp MaloneVocals – Tunde Adebimpe*
1-6 Tameyawt
1-7 Imidiwan Win Sahara
Vocals – Tunde Adebimpe*
1-8 Tamiditin Tan Ufrawan
1-9 Tiliaden Osamnat
1-10 Djeredjere
1-11 Iswegh Attay
Guitar, Vocals – Aroune Ag Alhabib, Kyp MaloneWritten-By – Kedou Ag Ossad, Liya Ag Ablil, Sanou Ag Ahmed
1-12 Takest Tamidaret
Guitar, Lead Vocals – Abdallah Ag AlhousseyniWritten-By – Abdallah Ag Alhousseyni
Tassili #2 - Bonus Tracks
2-1 Djegh Ishilan
2-2 El Huria Telitwar
Guitar, Lead Vocals – Alhassane Ag TouhamiWritten-By – Touhami Ag Alhassane*
2-3 Kud Edazamin
2-4 Nak Ezzaragh Tinariwen

Companies, etc.

Credits

Notes

Digifile.

(P) & (C) 2011 Wedge S.A.R.L. under exclusive licence to V2 Records International T/A Cooperative Music. Made in the EU.

Recorded November 1-20 2010, outdoors, in Tassili's N'Ajjer's dessert, South Algeria.
Select overdubs recorded January 18-20, 2011 at Studio Soyuz, Paris, France.
Nels Cline recorded by Tom Schick (The Loft - Chicago), Mark Wheaton (Catasonic - LA), Andris Balins (Barn - New York).
The Dirty Dozen Brass Band recorded by Jake Eckert at Rhythm Shack, New Orleans, USA.
Mixed on February 2011 at Studio Soyuz and March 2011 at Black Box Studios, Angers, France.
Mastered on April, 2011 at Golden Mastering, Ventura CA.

All songs published by Wedge SARL / Inear Publishing administrated by BMG Rights Management except Iswegh Attay [track 1-11] published by Première Music Group.

Barcode and Other Identifiers

  • Barcode (Text): 0 602527 769387
  • Barcode (String): 0602527769387
  • Rights Society: SACEM SDRM SACD SCAM
  • Matrix / Runout (CD1): [4 Universal logos] 06025 277 466-6 01 * 52766704 MADE IN GERMANY BY EDC A
  • Mastering SID Code (CD1): IFPI LV26
  • Mould SID Code (CD1): IFPI 0149
  • Matrix / Runout (CD2): [4 Universal logos] 06025 277 865-8 01 * 52766770 MADE IN GERMANY BY EDC A
  • Mastering SID Code (CD2): IFPI LV26
  • Mould SID Code (CD2): IFPI 0150

Other Versions (5 of 6) View All

Cat# Artist Title (Format) Label Cat# Country Year
VVR 774668 Tinariwen Tassili(CD, Album) V2 VVR 774668 Europe 2011 Sell This Version
VVR774667 Tinariwen Tassili(LP, Album) V2, Cooperative Music VVR774667 Europe 2011 Sell This Version
87148-1 Tinariwen Tassili(2xLP, Album + CD, Album + Ltd) Anti- 87148-1 US 2012 Sell This Version
VVR774666 Tinariwen Tassili(CD, Album) V2 VVR774666 Australasia 2011 Sell This Version
VVR774666 Tinariwen Tassili(CD, Album) V2 VVR774666 Europe 2011 Sell This Version

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BankofVinyl

BankofVinyl

March 21, 2012
edited over 5 years ago

Tinariwen, the Malian Touraeg group, finally broke through to Western audiences with 2007's Aman Iman and 2009's Imidiwan -- culminating in an appearance at the Glastonbury Festival -- 20 years after their inception. The increased profile did little to alter their "desert blues" with its incantatory droning -- primarily electric -- guitars, claps and organic percussion, and chanted vocals in songs about struggle and independence (some of Tinariwen's members were once rebel guerilla fighters). That sound comes out of a nation that exists between the harsh Sahara and the lush African savannah to the south, but it has less in common with other Malian musicians because the band is nomadic, never staying in one place for long. Tassili, named for the region of the Algerian desert they cut the record in, is Tinariwen's Anti label debut. It is similar, at least structurally, to its predecessors. Tinariwen play their trademark, labyrinthine music on acoustic guitars this time -- a back to basics development in itself. Conversely, they've allowed trusted producers Ian Brennan and Jean Paul Romann some liberties in letting Western musicians participate on some cuts. Opener "Imidiwan Ma Tennam" commences much as their music has in the past, with the guitars and lead vocals of Ibrahim Ag Alhabib to lead his bandmates in a snakey weave of handclaps, chants, and secondary guitars to follow his own. A little later, Nels Cline's electric guitar almost imperceptibly slithers into the mix, with a stunning but blunted array of effects; they take nothing away from the song's essence. "Ya Messinagh" begins as a single riff blues before handclaps and a second acoustic guitar answer it in what is the closest thing to a Delta blues intro that Tinariwen has recorded. Ag Alhabib's soulful earthy vocals are met at the end of the second verse by the sonorous open tones of brass and reeds by members of the Dirty Dozen Brass Band. What's amazing is just how seamless their interaction is. On "Walla Illa" and two other cuts, TV on the Radio's Tunde Adebimpe and Kyp Malone add vocals and guitars; they add a textual element to other cuts while restraining themselves vocally and instrumentally so as not to intrude. These artists may or may not extend the Touareg group's reach into the West. If so, they've done so without Tinariwen compromising their sound. These songs are simply Tinariwen doing what they do best: being themselves, albeit more powerfully, not because of the collaborations, but because of the acoustic approach they've taken here. Their sound is dustier, more evocative of the landscape they wander; Tassili is as desolate -- and as timeless -- as the desert itself.

BankofVinyl

BankofVinyl

March 21, 2012

Tinariwen, the Malian Touraeg group, finally broke through to Western audiences with 2007's Aman Iman and 2009's Imidiwan -- culminating in an appearance at the Glastonbury Festival -- 20 years after their inception. The increased profile did little to alter their "desert blues" with its incantatory droning -- primarily electric -- guitars, claps and organic percussion, and chanted vocals in songs about struggle and independence (some of Tinariwen's members were once rebel guerilla fighters). That sound comes out of a nation that exists between the harsh Sahara and the lush African savannah to the south, but it has less in common with other Malian musicians because the band is nomadic, never staying in one place for long. Tassili, named for the region of the Algerian desert they cut the record in, is Tinariwen's Anti label debut. It is similar, at least structurally, to its predecessors. Tinariwen play their trademark, labyrinthine music on acoustic guitars this time -- a back to basics development in itself. Conversely, they've allowed trusted producers Ian Brennan and Jean Paul Romann some liberties in letting Western musicians participate on some cuts. Opener "Imidiwan Ma Tennam" commences much as their music has in the past, with the guitars and lead vocals of Ibrahim Ag Alhabib to lead his bandmates in a snakey weave of handclaps, chants, and secondary guitars to follow his own. A little later, Nels Cline's electric guitar almost imperceptibly slithers into the mix, with a stunning but blunted array of effects; they take nothing away from the song's essence. "Ya Messinagh" begins as a single riff blues before handclaps and a second acoustic guitar answer it in what is the closest thing to a Delta blues intro that Tinariwen has recorded. Ag Alhabib's soulful earthy vocals are met at the end of the second verse by the sonorous open tones of brass and reeds by members of the Dirty Dozen Brass Band. What's amazing is just how seamless their interaction is. On "Walla Illa" and two other cuts, TV on the Radio's Tunde Adebimpe and Kyp Malone add vocals and guitars; they add a textual element to other cuts while restraining themselves vocally and instrumentally so as not to intrude. These artists may or may not extend the Touareg group's reach into the West. If so, they've done so without Tinariwen compromising their sound. These songs are simply Tinariwen doing what they do best: being themselves, albeit more powerfully, not because of the collaborations, but because of the acoustic approach they've taken here. Their sound is dustier, more evocative of the landscape they wander; Tassili is as desolate -- and as timeless -- as the desert itself.