Various ‎– Drum & Bass Selection 1

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Tracklist

Boogie Times Tribe The Dark Stranger (Q-Bass Remix) 4:46
DJ Crystl Warpdrive 4:50
Uncle 22 6 Million Ways To Die (DJ Hype Remix) 4:27
M Beat* Rumble 4:07
Engineers Without Fears Spiritual Aura 4:13
D'Cruze Watch Out 4:16
Gappa G & Hypa Hypa* Information Centre (DJ Ron Remix) 4:34
DJ Dextrous & Rude Boy Keith Lovable 3:54
M Beat* Shuffle 5:08
Subnation Scottie 4:13
Jo R Type 5:17
Acro Superpod 5:08
DJ Taktix The Way (VIP Remix) 4:48
Desired State Beyond Bass 5:19
Q Bass* Gun Connection 5:34
Roni Size & DJ Die Music Box 5:10

Versions (5)

Cat# Artist Title (Format) Label Cat# Country Year
BDRCD1, BDRCD 001 Various Drum & Bass Selection 1(CD, Comp) Breakdown Records, Breakdown Records BDRCD1, BDRCD 001 UK 1994 Sell This Version
BDRLP 001, BDRLP 1 Various Drum & Bass Selection 1(2xLP, Comp) Breakdown Records, Breakdown Records BDRLP 001, BDRLP 1 UK 1994 Sell This Version
BDRMC001 Various Drum & Bass Selection 1(Cass, Comp) Breakdown Records BDRMC001 UK 1994 Sell This Version
BDRMT001 DJ Hype Drum & Bass Selection 1(Cass, Comp, Mixed) Breakdown Records BDRMT001 UK 1994 Sell This Version
SRCS 7740 Various Drum & Bass Selection 1(CD, Comp) Sony Records SRCS 7740 Japan 1995 Sell This Version

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matt_bassline

matt_bassline

April 5, 2016
edited about 1 year ago
referencing Drum & Bass Selection 1, 2xLP, Comp, BDRLP 001, BDRLP 1

This was big for me back in early 1994 too. It was the first time I had any tunes like this on vinyl - up until then I'd only been exposed to Hardcore through pirate radio. I spent hour after hour mixing these tracks together on my Soundlab belt drives decks. Fast forward 22 years and the tracklisting on here speaks for itself. A great selection of tracks showing how the music had started to move on from the darkside of 1993 into the Jungle and Drum & Bass we know today. I own the original of every track released on this compilation, but still feel like digging my copy of this out to listen through them all once again.
Jarlek

Jarlek

January 2, 2015
referencing Drum & Bass Selection 1, Cass, Comp, Mixed, BDRMT001
I bought this tape in mid-94 ish, when the term 'Drum & Bass' wasn't really in full swing, more a case of Jungle. Back then, 'Jungle' (although a term that had been used for a number of years preceeding this point) was becoming the main force in the UK Breakbeat sound, it was suddenly available everywhere and a lot of compilations started to flood the market. I saw this tape and the fact it was 'DJ Hype' had no tracklisting and a mysterious, edgy kind of artwork was enough for me to buy it on a whim. At this point in time I was more focused or interested in Happy Breakbeat Hardcore ala Kniteforce, SMDs, Ramos, Supreme & Sunset Regime and co, so I wasn't sure what I was getting with this as I wasn't following Jungle too closely, except the odd mixtape and things like the "Hardcore Junglistic Fever" series.

Suffice to say, I really fell in love with this tape. I used to cain it on my paper rounds (even though I was 17!) and I was particularly swayed by the tracks "Shuffle", "Spiritual Aura", "Lovable" amongst others, but it was the DJ Ron remix of 'Information Centre' that really blew me away. When you listen to this mix it still retains that underground feel that made UK Hardcore Breakbeat in my eyes such a special, exciting, unusual and original form of music.

As much as I love 1992 (probably still my favourite year), you can hear a distinct maturity in these tracks, even though they still retain their Hardcore roots, they've grown and developed and the sound is, on reflection, quite gripping, mind-opening & mesmeric. I think a number of these tracks were made or developed in late 1993, so not entirely sure when this mixtape was first released or when Hype recorded it, but from the sublime scratching to the excellent mixing to the amazing tunes moving through all the aspects of the genres of Hardcore, Jungle & Drum N Bass this still ranks as one of my favourite mixes of the time and one which evokes only the sweetest of memories. Bloody awesome; respect DJ Hype & Breakdown Records :)
artrecs

artrecs

March 23, 2012
edited over 4 years ago
referencing Drum & Bass Selection 1, 2xLP, Comp, BDRLP 001, BDRLP 1
Yeah this does sound like a good comp. I'm really interested to find out if anybody knows what the sample is before Engineers Without Fears Spiritual Aura begins. It doesn't sound like a Jamaican accent, but it's old Ska or Reggae/or maybe a Two Tone tune, I'm not sure but would love to know. If you haven't heard it. it goes "What u talkin about you say you don't like the Jungle beats." Ta in advance, Toby.Hi found a german jungle comp-riot beats 9] it has 13 tracks witch are all wicked the last one use's the sample im on about thanks discogs.
ringorider

ringorider

November 27, 2009
referencing Drum & Bass Selection 1, 2xLP, Comp, BDRLP 001, BDRLP 1

This was a big compilation when I was young, and then I lost it for years. Got it back recently and it's even better than I remember. All the tracks are big, and quite a varied bunch, some really nice moody atmospheres on here. I like the way that it covers the earlier vibes of the jungle days from my point of view, not too early as it was 1994. You have the M Beat party tracks plus the moodier bits and some hardcore as well. I don't think there's one single cheesey track on here.
Komakino

Komakino

June 24, 2006
edited over 11 years ago
referencing Drum & Bass Selection 1, CD, Comp, BDRCD1, BDRCD 001
This release was the first to showcase (and name check) a new style of music that emerged from the ashes of rave and had mutated from the Darkcore subgenre. Whereas the latter eschewed the helium vocals and "toytown" samples (lovingly embraced by the nascent Happy Hardcore scene), the compliation title hints at the focus of the tracks in this compilation and where a newer style of music was moving towards. The tracklisting is chronological, with the link from Darkcore to D & B highlighted by the first three tracks - 'The Dark Stranger', the beat-driven 'Warpdrive', and the Uncle 22 remix. We are treated to the rapid machine-gun beats of Subnation's 'Scottie' and the Mad P-sampling 'The Way' along the way, but the overiding focus of the compilation is the emergence of the reggae/ragga vocal sample, showcased by at least two-thirds of the tracks here. The highlights however, are the two releases that do not rely on either the 'dark' or ragga vocal notions, namely 'Spiritual Aura' and 'Music Box'. Perhaps it is credit to the (reputation of the) producers involved, but these tracks still sound as fresh as they did back in 1993/94.