Various ‎– Step Write Run - Alphaphone Vol. 1

Label:
Touch ‎– Tone 6
Format:
2 × CD, Compilation
Country:
Released:
Genre:
Style:

Tracklist

1-1 Papadoctrine Hybrid Energy 8:06
1-2 Papadoctrine Dreamreader 10:32
1-3 Papadoctrine Flesh Hunter 9:21
1-4 Multiple Transmission Low Load 8:20
1-5 International Organisation Red Menace 8:23
1-6 Multiple Transmission Antichrist 5:44
2-1 Cold Warrior Yellow Square 7:03
2-2 Cold Warrior Walk East 9:32
2-3 Cold Warrior Witch Hunt 11:28
2-4 Cold Warrior Modern Art 8:35
2-5 Robots + Humanoids Indigo Octagon 8:07
2-6 Robots + Humanoids Paranoia 4:48
2-7 Robots + Humanoids Moment Of Truth 8:50

Companies, etc.

Credits

Notes

A selection of tracks all previously released on 12" by Richard H. Kirk on his own label Alphaphone Recordings, under different production monikers.

Barcode and Other Identifiers

  • Barcode: 4 013859 359683
  • Matrix / Runout (Disc 1): BOD SEMA 35968-1
  • Matrix / Runout (Disc 2): BOD SEMA 35968-2

Recommendations

Reviews

Add Review

Crijevo

Crijevo

May 29, 2008
edited 6 months ago
So, what's on this side of R. H. Kirk's many faces? Some always expect a link between Cabaret Voltaire and his solo later-ons - which in fact, stands principle in most of his work. A 'CV' tag he hardly shakes off even when not sounding that obvious in his research.

Like many of his peers, Kirk significantly progressed from the experimental to trance and back again - now, whether you're a die-hard fan or plain curious about it, 'Step Write Run' at best varies in showcasing much (if anything) in terms of adventurous, multidimensional solo work.

This sampler presents a list of monikers but that's as far as it goes - 'Papadoctrine', 'Multiple Transmission', 'International Organisation', 'Cold Warrior' and 'Robots + Humanoids' sadly leave the impression of mediocre, boringly flat material stretched over a double disc space. In a clubbing environment, most numbers surely fare better, but end up just as faceless in a sea of self-indulgent technocracy.

Some of the examples do show tiny marks of something dynamic (mostly on the second disc) - the mantra chant of 'Walk East', unusual intro of 'Modern Art', the crispy "Indigo Octagon" or the true standout track from the lot - the beautiful 'Moment of Truth'... If you insist, give it a go - some of it may work on repeated listens but there are far better images of Kirk's (other) self.