Victrola ‎– Maritime Tatami / A Game Of Despair

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heroinface

heroinface

January 16, 2018
edited 9 months ago
referencing Maritime Tatami, 12", RE, RM, DE-055
repress will be back in stock next week, do not pay more than $12
viziroasiz

viziroasiz

December 19, 2017
referencing Maritime Tatami, 12", RE, RM, DE-055
A perfect new-wave 12" to discover, both tracks are excellent in their genre.
case_la_roc

case_la_roc

September 12, 2017
edited about 1 year ago
referencing Maritime Tatami, 12", RE, RM, DE-055
Reminds me of high school, not that I had heard this in high school but just the feeling of so much desire to possess something and the knowledge that I never will. What an incredible release.
aaroninky

aaroninky

January 17, 2014
referencing Maritime Tatami / A Game Of Despair, 12", EES004
So glad this is getting a repress. Was introduced to it (I am not ashamed to say) by John Robert's superb RA mix ahead of the release of his 2013 'Fences', and it was easily the highlight of the mix for me. Could tell immediately it was of another time & place, and yet so attention-stealing and impressive even in this attention-starved now... timeless music. Even more incredible that it was Victrola's one and only release together. A real myth of a record! Glad to be able to add it to my collection.
code303

code303

September 17, 2013
referencing Maritime Tatami / A Game Of Despair, 12", EES004
Maritime Tatami features 303+606. We're talking 1983, the year these boxes came out.
mordiggian

mordiggian

May 15, 2011
edited over 7 years ago
referencing Maritime Tatami / A Game Of Despair, 12", EES004
It seems wrong to slap genre labels on Victrola, but their music is essentially minimal darkwave. Both songs are in a class of their own, downer overdose synthpop ballads with catatonic monotone vox. Oblique minor-key bass lines provide an anchor while snapping, brittle 606 rhythms propel the tracks along. It seems that many people prefer the A, which is certainly an incredible track, a bizarre virtual reality excursion that sounds as if John Foxx instead of Vangelis had composed the soundtrack for Blade Runner. The synths are shot through with a strain of melancholy usually found only in 8-bit video game soundtracks, but at the same time, there's a shoegazey trance quality to the melodic interplay that strangely gels with the snare-heavy rhythm track. However, for me the B is the real killer here. A post-punk guitar riff repeats hypnotically, as fragile icy synthlines chime emptily above it. The vox only last through the first half, giving way to one of the most bleak and haunting synthscapes ever committed to wax. This track will make you feel like an android dying of hypothermia. It's tragic that Victrola didn't release anything after this, as this EP doesn’t sound like anything else recorded in 83 or anytime after—it’s from a dimension of its own.