The Vision ‎– Spectral Nomad

Label:
Metroplex ‎– M-025
Format:
Vinyl, 12", 33 ⅓ RPM
Country:
Released:
Genre:
Style:

Tracklist

A1 Spectral Nomad 4:16
A2 Explain The Style 6:14
B1 Detroit: One Circle 7:01
B2 Modern And Ancient 2:55

Companies, etc.

Credits

Notes

℗ Detox (BMI)
Dist. by Submerge

Durations are not listed on the release itself.

Barcode and Other Identifiers

  • Matrix / Runout (Runout Side A): METROPLEX 025-A NSC
  • Matrix / Runout (Runout Side B): METROPLEX 025-B NSC
  • Rights Society: BMI

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Reviews Show All 19 Reviews

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mboisrond

mboisrond

March 2, 2017
So much talk about Rob Hood's awesome releases throughout the year, but this one was never mentioned once.
This is his baddest release right there.

A2 Explain The Style especially, is the most gut-wrenching and subtle machine funk record created by the Man. Patterns are lazy, dirty and will turn your mind into a soup at 4 am. It's only after long minutes that the smallest hihats will come pack another punch into the funky run, forcing you to bring your arm up.

Detroit techno diamond with an ironic title. You know what to play when someone asks you to "Explain him the Style"..
damnwords

damnwords

March 14, 2016
Juan Atkins said in a facebook post that this will get a repress pretty shortly.
https://www.facebook.com/JuanAtkinsTheOriginator/posts/10156634347580652
reiki89

reiki89

February 14, 2016
Really need a repress... dito!! come on juan put it on
Meusha

Meusha

December 7, 2015
Really need a repress...
beentheredonethat

beentheredonethat

June 11, 2015
whoa! when did this one become so expensive!!
tektim

tektim

February 13, 2015

One of the first techno records I bought. So glad I still have it! This is what it's all about.
modano182

modano182

November 13, 2014

Pretty obvious a repress is needed...carn Metroplex.
jantie

jantie

October 2, 2014
A repress for this record would be a shame. True Detroit gem, worth every cent.
ultrasound

ultrasound

December 7, 2007

Ten years ago, just like today, the 'm' word often had little to do with the concept attached to it. Sure, there are a few tracks here which are pretty stripped-down, but they seem more 'economical' and 'disciplined' than anything else. Still, Hood is amongst those for whom this lack of the 'M' Factor matters not one dot. The elements, the sequencing, the mixing all display that subtlety and intelligence for which he's become well-known. I believe these particular tracks are also amongst the first on which he deploys his signature 'vague-shapes-of-bass' (possibly created by live-tuning a kick drum over a one-bar sequence?) The title track stands-out from the other excellent pieces here for me, by a short-finger. It's the staccato, seemingly random pad pattern which miraculously assembles itself into a coherent gestalt in your mind, that's going to lure you, if you don't know this EP. Half-way through, the track opens-up like a metallic butterfly in a robotic cacaphony of extra drums. Yet somehow it seems eerily to remain glued together, as if it's on an assembly-line with dozens of robots tweaking various parts of it whilst it remains in motion. Like all obscure, rare and seemingly opaque artifacts, once understood, never forgotten.